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Northern Curlytail Lizard

Leiocephalus carinatus armouri

Description:

Northern Curlytail Lizard (Leiocephalus carinatus armouri) - a Florida invasive species, approx. 7-8 inches long, spotted mid-day between recycling bins at a supermarket in Delray Beach, Florida. << Males may reach a length of 28 cm (11 in) and have a gray to tan back, light stripes on the nape and dorsolaterally, and a low vertebral crest. The dark-banded tail is held curved above the back. ... This species was released intentionally in the 1940s in Palm Beach in an attempt to rid sugarcane of insect pests, and it has since expanded both north and south. ... It is now common in parks, in agricultural lands, along canal edges, along seawalls, and in other habitats in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. >>

Habitat:

Northern Curlytail Lizard - Leiocephalus carinatus armouri - This species was released intentionally in the 1940s in Palm Beach in an attempt to rid sugarcane of insect pests, and it has since expanded both north and south. This native of the Bahama Islands is also popular in the pet trade, which has resulted in additional releases and escapes. It is now common in parks, in agricultural lands, along canal edges, along seawalls, and in other habitats in Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. Its range is relatively contiguous for 90 km along the Atlantic Coast from Hobe Sound, Martin County, south to Lighthouse Point, Broward County. This alert, robust lizard is mostly terrestrial but climbs well, especially preferring areas with ground rubble. Males may reach a length of 28 cm (11 in) and have a gray to tan back, light stripes on the nape and dorsolaterally, and a low vertebral crest. The dark-banded tail is held curved above the back. Another subspecies (virescens) occurred in Miami prior to 1940, but died out shortly afterwards. A third subspecies (coryi) was found on Virginia Key and Key Biscayne in Dade County, but its present status is unknown. It has been observed being preyed upon by a Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea). Habitats: Coastal upland, Exotic plant community, Low density suburban development, areas peripheral to core urban areas, and small towns, Agricultural habitat, Recently disturbed, early successional community. (credit: http://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnat...)


1 species ID suggestions

Xiaoxuan
Xiaoxuan 2 years ago
Curly-tailed lizard
None

1 Comment

JackEng
JackEng 2 years ago

Xiaoxuan,
Thank you for your species ID...

Florida, USA

Lat: 26.45, Long: -80.16

Spotted on Mar 27, 2012
Submitted on Mar 30, 2012

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