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pod-sucking bug

Riptortus serripes

Description:

The pod-sucking bug belongs to the Family "Alydidae, commonly known as broad-headed bugs, a family of true bugs very similar to the closely related Coreidae (leaf-footed bugs and relatives). There are about 40 genera with 250 species altogether. Distributed in the temperate and warmer regions of the Earth, most are tropical and subtropical animals." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alydidae. AKA the brown bean bug, Riptortus serripes is brown in colour with yellow lines along each side of the body. Its body is slim and narrower in the middle, with short sharp spine on each side of the thorax. It also has strong spiny hind legs. The bug is an active flyer. Adults can be found on other plant leaves. When disturbed, the bug will eject some yellow smelly liquid as defense (See 2nd photo).

Habitat:

Spotted on a peacock flower seed pod (Caesalpinia pulcherrima) in a large semi-urban yard & garden situated next to a disturbed patch of remnant forest.

Notes:

True to its common name, this broad-headed bug was spotted on a seed pod.

No species ID suggestions

5 Comments

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 5 years ago

Yes, I didn't realize it until I was reading about the species while trying to ID it. :-)

Maria dB
Maria dB 5 years ago

Nice that you got a shot of the defense mechanism!

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 5 years ago

I suspect that this species favors or specializes on seed pods, although it will eat on grasses too as an adult (I read).

Ashish Nimkar
Ashish Nimkar 5 years ago

Scott is this another type in Alydidae or its common seed eatig feature in this type bugs..?

Sachin Zaveri
Sachin Zaveri 5 years ago

Nice spotting,

Indonesia

Lat: -2.56, Long: 140.50

Spotted on Apr 8, 2012
Submitted on Apr 9, 2012

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