Project Noah

Project Noah is a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.

Join Project Noah Today

Osprey

Pandion haliaetus

Description:

I wasn't planning on posting any more photos of the Ospreys until I saw chicks but I was so disturbed when I saw this and think it's a good representation of what happens to our plastic bags and fishing lines & hooks when they're discarded. I notified the local wildlife rescue center and provided a photo. This is so sad.



No species ID suggestions

20 Comments

Wilsons
Wilsons a year ago

everywhere we go we find ourselves cleaning up after others. thank you for documenting this.

Thank you Karen! I am so glad you are highlighting this problem so many of us have witnessed in nature. I'm sorry I haven't been on lately but I do plan to be back in the next week or two. I miss seeing all of the wonderful and fascinating spottings from this amazing community.

KarenL
KarenL a year ago

Congratulations Lorelei, your spotting has been featured in the Project Noah blog today as an example of the impact that the plastics we consume is having on the environment. http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/3233203...

Thank you so much Ismael!

Ismael Chaves
Ismael Chaves 2 years ago

Great series your birds collection is fabulous!

Thank you for your thoughtful comments Karen. It's a shame that you have to pick up the trash, line and hooks but I'm thankful that you do!

KarenL
KarenL 2 years ago

Beautiful series!
I find it heartbreaking to see all the trash left by anglers that use the lake in our state parks. I regularly pick up long lengths of line that could easily entangle a birds feet, hooks, broken bottles, cans & so much more. It is so thoughtless & irresponsible, especially as there are usually plenty of garbage cans about.

Thank you, mrh, both for your comments and for teaching your students about this and other important issues. Thanks to teachers like you that get students involved they grow up to make a difference in this world.

mrh
mrh 2 years ago

This bird and these photos are so wrong but are also so right for teaching kids that those silly bags cause real harm to beautiful things - thanks from all of us - teachers and students!

MaryEvans2
MaryEvans2 2 years ago

So glad to hear this had a happy ending.

Thank you all! This story, at least, had a happy ending.

annorion
annorion 2 years ago

Beautiful bird! This is really sad to see but am glad you shared and glad they are ok.

harsuame
harsuame 2 years ago

Grandioso!!!

KatCuff
KatCuff 2 years ago

nice!!

Maria dB
Maria dB 2 years ago

This is a great educational spotting!

It is Birdlady6000. I knew that posting the photo here on Project Noah, people would understand.

birdlady6000
birdlady6000 2 years ago

So disturbing.

ChristyHolland
ChristyHolland 2 years ago

Wonderful! I'm glad they've got you looking after them!! ;-)

It is one of the pair I've been watching. When I cropped & enlarged the photo I also saw a three pronged hook. I couldn't tell if it was attached to the fish or the Osprey. I'm happy to report, though, that returned to check on them just before dusk - the bag was gone and both birds are fine. The village within the town that I live in enacted a ban on plastic bags. Unfortunately the town itself voted down the ban this year so it's only in a smaller area but it's a start.

ChristyHolland
ChristyHolland 2 years ago

That is so awful! I see bags everywhere!! Is that bag attached to the fish or the osprey? He is carrying a fish, right? Is this one of the pair you're watching?

Hampton Bays, New York, USA

Lat: 40.86, Long: -72.52

Spotted on Apr 10, 2012
Submitted on Apr 10, 2012

Reference

Related spottings

Aguila pescadora Osprey Osprey Osprey

Nearby spottings

American Oystercatcher Northern Mockingbird American Oystercatcher Red Breasted Merganser