Project Noah

Project Noah is a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.

Join Project Noah Today

Baya Weaver

Ploceus philippinus

Description:

Lots of nests can been seen in the second picture. They have a stout conical bill and a short square tail. Non-breeding males and females look alike, dark brown streaked fulvous buff above, plain whitish fulvous below, eyebrow long and buff coloured, bill is horn coloured and no mask. Breeding males have a bright yellow crown, dark brown mask, blackish brown bill, upper parts are dark brown streaked with yellow, with a yellow breast and cream buff below.

Habitat:

Seen near farms.

Notes:

Flocks of these birds are found in grasslands, cultivated areas, scrub and secondary growth and they are best known for their hanging retort shaped nests woven from leaves. These nest colonies are usually found on thorny trees or palm fronds and the nests are often built near water or hanging over water where predators cannot reach easily. Baya Weavers are best known for the elaborately woven nests constructed by the males. These pendulous nests are retort shaped, with a central nesting chamber and a long vertical tube that leads to a side entrance to the chamber. The nests are woven with long strips of paddy leaves, rough grasses and long strips torn from palm fronds. A male bird is known to make up to 500 trips to complete a nest. The birds use their strong beaks to strip and collect the strands, and to weave and knot them while building their nests. The males take about 18 days to construct the complete nest with the intermediate "helmet stage" taking about 8 days. The nests are partially built before the males begin to display to passing females by flapping their wings and calling while hanging from their nests. The females inspect the nest and signal their acceptance of a male. Once a male and a female are paired, the male goes on to complete the nest by adding the entrance tunnel. Males are almost solely in charge of nest building, though their female partners may join in giving the finishing touches, particularly on the interiors. Females may modify the interiors or add blobs of mud.

No species ID suggestions

7 Comments

Wild Things
Wild Things 2 years ago

Thanks Ava and welcome Emma.

Ava T-B
Ava T-B 2 years ago

Wonderful nest picture (#2) and terrific information. Thanks.

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 2 years ago

thanks for the interesting info. I am so amazed by these creatures.

Wild Things
Wild Things 2 years ago

Yes Emma you are right. You can see some incomplete nests in the second pic. As added in the notes: The females inspect the nest and signal their acceptance of a male. Once a male and a female are paired, the male goes on to complete the nest by adding the entrance tunnel.

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 2 years ago

I had read previously that the females discard the nests if they perceive it as not perfect. MAybe that was the reason i found so many lying under the tree.

Wild Things
Wild Things 2 years ago

These nests are a very good souvenir. I keep searching for them. Hope you save the nests that you have :-)

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 2 years ago

i collected these nests when I was a kid. Now I wish i had not thrown them away. That also reminds me to save the dove and humming bird nests which i had found some days ago, Strong winds probably knocked them out.

Maharashtra, India

Lat: 19.80, Long: 72.75

Spotted on Jul 20, 2012
Submitted on Jul 28, 2012

Reference

Related spottings

Baya Weaver Tecelão-de-cabeça-preta ..  Ploceus melanocephalus Baya Weaver Black-headed weaver

Nearby spottings

Unnamed spotting Unknown Nest Stink Bug Nymphs Beet Webworm