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Electric Eel

Electrophorus electricus

Notes:

This 1 meter long electric eel was foraging in a tiny, narrow creek in the middle of the rainforest about 1 km from the river.



No species ID suggestions

8 Comments

GeoffreyPalmer
GeoffreyPalmer 4 years ago

Thank you everybody. Sorry for the delayed response! I have not been getting enough Project Noah time lately! :( Sergio, I have not seen them out of the water, and without any real strong fins, I would doubt they could move on land effectively? No worries AmazonWorkshops, you are certainly welcome!

AmazonWorkshops
AmazonWorkshops 4 years ago

This is awesome! So sorry it has taken so long to thank you for your great contributions.

Sergio Monteiro
Sergio Monteiro 5 years ago

Magnificent spotting, Geoffrey, I still want to see one in the wild. Please tell me, did you ever see one of these on dry land? A friend told me that they can "walk" on land for short distances, do you think it is possible?

AshleyT
AshleyT 5 years ago

Very cool fact! Neat spotting, Geoffrey!

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Fun fact! Many species of Amazonian fish emit small amounts of electricity, but the electric eel (not actually a true eel but a species of knifefish) is one you definitely wouldn’t want to mess with - It grows up to eight-foot long and is able to create a whopping 600-volt blast to disable its prey and defend against potential predators.

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=...

smuknuts
smuknuts 6 years ago

Das ku

GrahamDeVey
GrahamDeVey 6 years ago

Great photo, Geoffrey. Would you consider adding your spotting to the mission Energy Champions?

ScottHarte
ScottHarte 6 years ago

freaking sweet.

Fernando Lores, Loreto, Peru

Lat: -4.37, Long: -73.00

Spotted on Jul 9, 2010
Submitted on Aug 3, 2012

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