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Wild Blackberry

Rubus

Description:

Tall, thorny, arching cane with palmate-compound leaves, white, 5-petaled flowers and familiar fruit; flowers white to pinkish, 5-petaled, radially-symmetrical 3/4 inch across, with many bushy stamens, in loose clusters. Fruit aggregate, black, elliptical, faceted, 1/2 to 1-1/2 inches long; The fruit, which ripens from mid-summer to early fall, goes from green to red to black. Leaves palmate-compound, up to 7 inches long, 3 to 7-parted, leaflets sharply toothed, up to 2 inches long; stem biennial cane trailing or up to 9 feet tall, arching, reddish-brown, sharply thorny; roots perennial.

Habitat:

Thickets, along roadsides and the trail edges, in fields, on mountains, in young woodlands, and near the seashore.

Notes:

This area used to be farmland, so these wild plants might very well be their ancestors. Medicinally, the blackberry plant has been used to treat a variety of ailments for many years. In this country, blackberry roots were used to make a tea that helped alleviate the problem of diarrhea and dysentery. In addition, a tea made from the dried leaves has been used by herbalists as a blood purifier. Also, blackberry fruit is rich in dietary fiber and a good source of Vitamin C, making it valuable for maintaining good health. Another value of the blackberry plant is its use as a wild edible. Many people enjoy the fresh, sweet tasting fruit that ripens from June to September. The fruit can also be cooked and added to cobblers or used to make delicious jellies. The tender, young peeled sprouts and twigs can be eaten raw or added to salads. The leaves can be dried to make a pleasant, healthy tea.

1 species ID suggestions

Wild Black Raspberry
Rubus occidentalis L

13 Comments

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 5 years ago

And Thimbleberry(a type of wild raspberry), salmon berry, currants, etc. We have them all

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 5 years ago

That's great to know! You can be our official" Blackberry "and "Oregon Grape" person!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 5 years ago

I live in blackberry country. We have the small and delicate natives, the hybridized/feral ones and a few oddballs on top of that. Anywhere there is sun there are blackberries of some type

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 5 years ago

Thanks Karen ,we have decided to go with Black Berry too

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 5 years ago

I thought that thorn looked like a blackberry

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 5 years ago

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/689...
Keithp2012,
My spotting has a thorn in it. Does it make this a Wild Blackberry? Feedback appreciated

keithp2012
keithp2012 5 years ago

I went back today and picked the berry, it left the stem behind, indicating it's a Blackberry. To further back it up, the stems had a few large thorns on them, where wild Raspberry have a bunch of thorns in bunches, making them appear "fuzzy". So this is a Wild Blackberry. They taste very good. :)

Hema Shah
Hema Shah 5 years ago

Educational!

keithp2012
keithp2012 5 years ago

Only way to test is to pick one, if there is no hole in the top of the fruit then it's a Blackberry, otherwise the plants look nearly identical.

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 5 years ago

Looks more like wild blackberry, both in the ripe and the green stage of the berries. Raspberries generally have smaller sections and are less shiny

keithp2012
keithp2012 5 years ago

still need id

keithp2012
keithp2012 6 years ago

new pictures added

keithp2012
keithp2012 6 years ago

Wild Black Raspberry (without fruit)

New York, USA

Lat: 40.70, Long: -73.35

Spotted on Sep 9, 2010
Submitted on Sep 9, 2010

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