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Thorny Devil

Moloch horridus

Habitat:

Desert scrub

Notes:

This individual has darkened its markings in response to warmer temperatures.


No species ID suggestions

20 Comments

lori.tas
lori.tas 4 years ago

Yes, I am a contributor to Wikipedia, and many of the photos I've posted here at Noah I've contributed there as well.

MelanieAustralia
MelanieAustralia 4 years ago

did u write the article on wiki about Thorny devil? Cause it is the same pic that you posted here. :)

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Good onya too Lori! 15 acres sounds like a lot of hard work but a very worthwhile project.

lori.tas
lori.tas 5 years ago

As we say downunder, 'good onya Karen'. And yeah, there are plenty of organizations in the US that can help you with covenanting your property, so do look into it

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Our land was pretty much all pasture although we are bordered on one side by mixed woodland, so we are really just adding to it. So far this year we have planted over 60 native trees, a 300' mixed hedgerow & started creating a few beds of native plants (fruit & seeds for the birds, nectar for the butterflies!). Our next project will be to dig a couple of ponds including a 80' earth pond which hopefully will bring in plenty of frogs, toads & dragonflies. We're also certified as a wildlife habitat though I hadn't thought about covenanting it - what a great idea!

Dangermouse
Dangermouse 5 years ago

Thanks, lori.tas, it's a nickname I've picked up at work!! I think that's what great about Noah, it's encouraging us to not just post photos, but actually learn about the animals we're photographing, and I'm learning something new every day just by looking at other people's photos. :) It's a great sharing experience.

lori.tas
lori.tas 5 years ago

Dangermouse (love your name, btw) I only read about the "dew" function of their spines in a recently published article. It's amazing how much we keep 'discovering' about animals we already know.

lori.tas
lori.tas 5 years ago

We are accredited "Land for Wildlife". And have put a covenant on our property to keep it mainly native bush and native grasses. The grass bit is important as Tasmania has less than 3% of its original native grasslands.

We are slowly but surely replacing all the non-native garden flowers with natives. It's important not to go too fast, as the bird especially have come to rely on things like fuchsias, horehound, etc. So we're planting other native nectar bearing flowers, with the intention of letting them get big before we remove the pre-existing plants. A lillypilly and another banksia went in just yesterday.

Dangermouse
Dangermouse 5 years ago

Great picture, and interesting to read about these fellars. Thanks for sharing. :)

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Me too! We have 8 acres here that we are in the process of improving as wildlife habitat & most of my current spottings are of the various birds & bugs that inhabit our land!

lori.tas
lori.tas 5 years ago

Isn't it Karen. But they are really sweet. Apparently the 'thorns' create runnels that condense and channel the night-time dew into droplets that then find their way to it's mouth.

lori.tas
lori.tas 5 years ago

Thanks Greg. I'm both American and Australian so I've had two great big continents to travel without ever leaving home (except for Canada and Mexico, and New Zealand, of course). Most of my American photos are pre-digital camera, so it's going to take a bit of scanning before I get those posted.

Mostly I like documenting our 15 acres. We have over 40 species of birds and 16 species of native orchids (some of which are starting to come up right now). In addition, I photograph anything else that catches my eye. If you look really close on Google maps, you can see our house. ;)

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Interesting scientific name!

KarenL
KarenL 5 years ago

Wow, what an interesting creature!

GregMasteller
GregMasteller 5 years ago

Great stuff right there. You must get around - huge pic collection here!

PaulMcK
PaulMcK 6 years ago

i love the way they move

Isabela
Isabela 6 years ago

Increadible!

Bruno
Bruno 6 years ago

Wow, this creature is amazing.

peter
peter 6 years ago

Crazy!

lori.tas
lori.tas 6 years ago

The most unstressed wild reptile I've ever encountered.

Western Australia, Australia

Lat: -30.60, Long: 115.16

Spotted on Sep 24, 2005
Submitted on Oct 14, 2010

Reference

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