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Black field Cricket (female)

Gryllus bimaculatus

Description:

This Black field Cricket belong to the order Orthoptera, and family Gryllidae (true crickets). A cricket’s body is composed of three sections: abdomen, thorax and head. At sexual maturity (approximately 2-3cm body) the female will have two cercus and an ovipositor at the end of her abdomen.

Habitat:

Two of those were found when dismounting a meeting tent that had been mounted outside for fice days.

Notes:

The Cricket life span is dependent on temperature and environmental conditions, but they generally live for 2-3 months. Higher temperatures will decrease their life span but increase growth rate. A cricket will usually reach sexual maturity around 5-6 weeks depending on temperate and environmental conditions. The short lifecycle of the cricket means that they must continually produce young crickets to maintain the colony. Male actively seeks the female, or attracts the female with a chirping sound made by rubbing the serrated edges of his forewings (stridulation). Fast chirping is made when a threatening male approaches, and a slower chirping is made to entice a female to mate. Mating takes place and the male fertilizes female eggs. The female lays eggs approximately 1cm into damp earth or organic material. When conditions are suitable a cricket can lay eggs every second week throughout most of their adult life. Eggs hatch approximately 11-14 days later (when bred at around 30 degrees Celsius). The young are approximately 2-3mm in length and are small replicates of their parents called pinheads or nymphs. As the crickets grow they need to shed their skin (moulting) having a number of nymph stages. A cricket that has moulted is white/yellow in color and is susceptible to being eaten until its exoskeleton (outer body casing) hardens. I have trained my colleagues well! If they see something interesting, they go fetch me! This spotting is a result of that :D

No species ID suggestions

8 Comments

FaredinAliyevski
FaredinAliyevski 8 months ago

Good no need for suggestion! Nothing is easy for me it's your spottings that are too interesting so I can't help it. Don't give me hard ones because I still haven't identified your foam nest tree frog and the new moth :). I will check them later tonight now it's a movie time :)

Tiz
Tiz 8 months ago

Faredin, I think my spottings are to easy for you... Give me 15 mins and I will give you a real challenge! :)

Sckel
Sckel 8 months ago

No. It's about something else, but I can not say here. ^^

Tiz
Tiz 8 months ago

Yeps! And happy about my new Cricket knowledge :D

Sckel
Sckel 8 months ago

I think you're laughing, Miss

Tiz
Tiz 8 months ago

Hmm, I take that back... The one without a wing is a female as well :P

Tiz
Tiz 8 months ago

OOh! Nope I have never seen one, but I have most likely heard them :) This info from Wiki is extra interesting "In the wild, male crickets do not tolerate one another and will fight until there is a winner. The loser usually retreats without serious injury". In the third photo, the cricket misses a wing. Most likely due to a fight! Thanks Fareding for the enlightenment! (why no species suggestion?)

FaredinAliyevski
FaredinAliyevski 8 months ago

That's a nice spotting. It's neither beetle nor hopper. It's something totally different called cricket. You must have seen them in Sweden. This species is most likely Field Cricket 'Gryllus bimaculatus', it's distinguished from others by those two yellow spots. Check it here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gryllus_bim...

Mozambique

Lat: -22.00, Long: 35.32

Spotted on Aug 17, 2013
Submitted on Aug 20, 2013

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