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Florida Red Bellied Cooter

Pseudemys rubriventris

Description:

Florida Red Bellied cooter is a species of large herbivorous freshwater turtle in the genus Pseudemys.Cooters are basking turtles and spend much of the day lying in the sun on logs or floating mats of vegetation. Red-bellied cooters can be found in rivers, streams, lakes, ponds, ditches, sloughs, marshes and mangrove bordered creeks.

Habitat:

Urban pond


No species ID suggestions

5 Comments

ceherzog
ceherzog 3 years ago

Thanks p. for all that good information. Wow! 1000 spottings!

NicoleLook
NicoleLook 3 years ago

Great pictures and congratulations on your 1000th spotting.

p.young713
p.young713 3 years ago

The yellow-bellied slider (Trachemys scripta scripta) is a land and water turtle belonging to the family Emydidae. This subspecies of pond slider is native to the southeastern United States, specifically from Florida to southeastern Virginia,[1] and is the most common turtle species in its range.[2] It is found in a wide variety of habitats, including slow-moving rivers, floodplain swamps, marshes, seasonal wetlands, and permanent ponds
The Coastal cooter (Pseudemys concinna floridana) or Florida cooter is a species of large herbivorous freshwater turtle in the genus Pseudemys.
The species is found within the southeastern coastal plain of the United States, from extreme southeastern Virginia southward through all of Florida and westward to the vicinity of Mobile Bay, Alabama. The nominate race (P. f. floridana) occupies most of the species' geographic range but is replaced in the Florida peninsula by the Peninsula cooter (Pseudemys peninsularis), which is primarily distinguished by differences in head markings.
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/turtles/psef...

The slider turtle is one of the most ubiquitous and conspicuous species of turtle in the Southeast. It occurs in every type of wetland and is frequently observed basking. Individuals are also commonly encountered on land when moving between aquatic habitats. The carapace is olive to dark brown, slightly keeled, and lightly patterned in some individuals. The plastron and the underside of the marginals are typically marked with two or more large, solid black dots or blotches. Males have elongated foreclaws and long, thickened tails. Some males may also become very dark with age. The yellow stripe behind the eye is broadest directly behind the eye. Nesting females are frequently seen from May through July.
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/turtles/tras...
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/SPARC/trip2....
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/SliderBook/C...
The name "cooter" comes from "kuta", the word for turtle in several African dialects.

** PROTECTED **
The Suwanee Cooter, Pseudemys concinna suwanniensis, is found in drainage areas of rivers that feed into the Gulf of Mexico from Hillsborough to Gulf County. Its shell has yellow markings that appear to be spirals at a short distance. It also has yellow stripes on its head and front feet. It reaches a maximum length of 16". It leaves its water habitat only to nest during the summer.

The Florida Cooter, Pseudemys floridana floridana, is found in the panhandle and northern Florida. Its shell is dark with faint yellow markings. It has yellow markings on its head and feet. It may reach 13" in length.

The Peninsula Cooter, Pseudemys floridana peninsularis, is found in lakes and slow-moving streams throughout the state. It is one of the most commonly seen turtles, often basking on banks and logs, or crossing roads. Its shell is brown with yellow lines radiating to the sides. It has yellow markings, some shaped like a hairpin, on its head and neck. It grows to a length of 15".





Trachemys scripta elegans (Wied-Neuwied, 1839) - Red-eared Slider

The Red-eared Slider, Trachemys scripta elegans, is found in isolated areas on the peninsula. It was originally found only west of the Mississippi River and often sold in pet stores. It has bright red, orange or yellow patches on each side of its head and grows to 11.5"

Native to the Mississippi Valley from Illinois to the Gulf of Mexico, red-eared sliders have been introduced throughout much of the rest of the continental United States and Hawaii (as well as other parts of the world). Its high adaptability has allowed the species to become the dominant turtle species in many introduced areas, and it may be displacing native turtles species in those areas. Most introductions are believed to be the result of intentional or accidental releases of pets: this species was the popular "dime store turtle" of the mid-1900’s.
http://el.erdc.usace.army.mil/ansrp/ANSI...
http://el.erdc.usace.army.mil/ansrp/ANSI...



The Yellowbelly Slider, Trachemys scripta scripta, is found in north Florida. It has a dark shell with lighter wide bars. It has a yellow patch behind each eye and a bright yellow belly with two black spots. It also grows to 11".

The yellow-bellied slider (Trachemys scripta scripta) is a land and water turtle belonging to the family Emydidae. This subspecies of pond slider is native to the southeastern United States, specifically from Florida to southeastern Virginia,[1] and is the most common turtle species in its range.[2] It is found in a wide variety of habitats, including slow-moving rivers, floodplain swamps, marshes, seasonal wetlands, and permanent ponds
The Coastal cooter (Pseudemys concinna floridana) or Florida cooter is a species of large herbivorous freshwater turtle in the genus Pseudemys.
The species is found within the southeastern coastal plain of the United States, from extreme southeastern Virginia southward through all of Florida and westward to the vicinity of Mobile Bay, Alabama. The nominate race (P. f. floridana) occupies most of the species' geographic range but is replaced in the Florida peninsula by the Peninsula cooter (Pseudemys peninsularis), which is primarily distinguished by differences in head markings.
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/turtles/psef...

The slider turtle is one of the most ubiquitous and conspicuous species of turtle in the Southeast. It occurs in every type of wetland and is frequently observed basking. Individuals are also commonly encountered on land when moving between aquatic habitats. The carapace is olive to dark brown, slightly keeled, and lightly patterned in some individuals. The plastron and the underside of the marginals are typically marked with two or more large, solid black dots or blotches. Males have elongated foreclaws and long, thickened tails. Some males may also become very dark with age. The yellow stripe behind the eye is broadest directly behind the eye. Nesting females are frequently seen from May through July.
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/turtles/tras...
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/SPARC/trip2....
http://www.uga.edu/srelherp/SliderBook/C...

p.young713
p.young713 3 years ago

Hi, ceherzog!
No the two turtles are not the same species. The cooter is a protected native turtle and the slider was introduced the result of intentional or accidental releases of pets: this species was the popular "dime store turtle" of the mid-1900’s. It is displacing the native cooter.

ceherzog
ceherzog 3 years ago

Are cooter's the same thing as Sliders? I'm wondering if these are native or escaped or released pets. Guess I need to do some research.

Tampa, Florida

Lat: 27.95, Long: -82.47

Spotted on Sep 11, 2011
Submitted on Sep 13, 2011

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