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Lepiota americana

Leucoagaricus americanus

Description:

Ecology: Saprobic; growing alone, scattered or gregariously in lawns and meadows, in sawdust piles or wood chips, near waste places, sometimes on stumps; late summer; widely distributed in North America but found more frequently east of the Rocky Mountains. Cap: 3-15 cm, oval when young, becoming convex to broadly convex or flat in age; dry; smooth at first; becoming scaly with reddish to reddish brown scales; the center typically remaining smooth in age; whitish but reddening with maturity or after being handled; the margin becoming lacerated and ragged in old age. Gills: Free from the stem; close; white when young; staining pinkish to reddish brown. Stem: 7-14 cm long; .5-2.5 cm thick; distinctively swollen towards the base; smooth; firm; white, but soon discoloring reddish to reddish brown; bruising fairly promptly yellow, then slowly reddish, when rubbed; with a high, collarlike ring. Flesh: White throughout; bruising yellow to orange when young; in age drying reddish; thick. Odor and Taste: Not distinctive. Spore Print: White. Microscopic Features: Spores 8-14 x 5-10 µ; smooth; elliptical; dextrinoid; with a small pore. Cheilocystidia clavate or clavate with a long neck. Pleurocystidia absent. Pileipellis of long, upright, cylindric elements. Lepiota bresadolae is a synonym. REFERENCES: (Peck, 1872) Vellinga, 2000. (Saccardo, 1887; Atkinson, 1900; Kauffman, 1918; Kauffman, 1924; H. V. Smith, 1954; Smith, Smith & Weber, 1979; Arora, 1986; Phillips, 1991/2005; Lincoff, 1992; Metzler & Metzler, 1992; Vellinga, 2000; Vellinga, de Kok & Bruns, 2003; McNeil, 2006; Kuo, 2007.) Herb. Kuo 08289702, 09210101, 06300704. http://www.mushroomexpert.com/leucoagari...

Habitat:

Saprobic; growing alone, scattered or gregariously in lawns and meadows, in sawdust piles or wood chips, near waste places, sometimes on stumps; late summer; widely distributed in North America but found more frequently east of the Rocky Mountains.

Notes:

This urban mushroom typically appears in late summer or early fall, in sawdust piles, on wood chips, around waste places or on stumps. It can be fairly easily identified by its distinctive swollen stem, which turns yellow, then slowly reddish, when rubbed. Its cap is scaly, and also turns reddish as the mushroom matures. All but the most recent field guides will list Leucoagaricus americanus as "Lepiota americana," but recent DNA studies indicate the mushroom is more closely related to species like Leucoagaricus naucinus than to species like Lepiota cristata. http://www.mushroomexpert.com/leucoagari...

No species ID suggestions

8 Comments

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 2 years ago

Thanks, Mayra!

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 2 years ago

Wonderful!!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 2 years ago

I have since added a clearer photo.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 2 years ago

It was a Lepiota, but it has changed. I put Lepiota as the common name because that is what it is known as.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 2 years ago

@EdwardNathanReulbachHr.: thanks for the suggestion. It appears after Hurricane Irene. I will do some further research as well. :)

can't be sure of the exact name dure to the decay but I am 99.9% positive it is a mamber of the Lepiota family.

this is in a somewhat advanced stage and begining to decay but I believe it is still able to be identified. Will check my book for New York, the center of the cap should be enough to get an ID.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 2 years ago

I could not find anything on the internet on this...

New York, USA

Lat: 42.36, Long: -74.06

Spotted on Sep 7, 2011
Submitted on Jan 31, 2012

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