>"/>
Project Noah

Project Noah is a tool to explore and document wildlife and a platform to harness the power of citizen scientists everywhere.

Join Project Noah Today

Pig (Domestic Duroc Hybrid Piglets)

Sus scrofa domesticus

Description:

Domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) - two piglets - at Fruit & Spice Park, Homestead (Redland), Florida. The pair escaped from their enclosure and, in first photo, are enjoying their short-lived "freedom." << The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, although some authors call it S. domesticus, reserving S. scrofa for the wild boar. They are born brownish coloured and tend to turn more grayish coloured with age. ... Pigs are intelligent and can be trained to perform numerous tasks and tricks. Recently, they have enjoyed a measure of popularity as house pets, particularly the dwarf breeds. >>

Habitat:

A pig is any of the animals in the genus Sus, within the Suidae family of even-toed ungulates. Pigs include the domestic pig, its ancestor the wild boar, and several other wild relatives. Pigs are omnivores and are highly social and intelligent animals. A typical pig has a large head with a long snout which is strengthened by a special prenasal bone and by a disk of cartilage at the tip. The snout is used to dig into the soil to find food and is a very acute sense organ. There are four hoofed toes on each foot, with the two larger central toes bearing most of the weight, but the outer two also being used in soft ground. With around 2 billion individuals alive at any time, the domesticated pig is one of the most numerous large mammals on the planet. Pigs have been domesticated since ancient times in the Old World. Archaeological evidence suggests that pigs were being managed in the wild in a way similar to the way they are managed by some modern New Guineans from wild boar as early as 13,000–12,700 BP in the Near East in the Tigris Basin. Remains of pigs have been dated to earlier than 11,400 BP in Cyprus that must have been introduced from the mainland which suggests domestication in the adjacent mainland by then. A separate domestication also occurred in China. Pigs were brought to southeastern North America from Europe by Hernando de Soto and other early Spanish explorers. Pigs are particularly valued in China and on certain oceanic islands, where their self-sufficiency allows them to be turned loose, although the practice is not without its drawbacks (see Environmental impact). With managed rotational grazing techniques pigs can be raised in an environmentally sound manner on pasture much like grazing sheep, goats and cows without high grain inputs. The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) is usually given the scientific name Sus scrofa, although some authors call it S. domesticus, reserving S. scrofa for the wild boar. It was domesticated approximately 5,000 to 7,000 years ago. Their coats are coarse and bristly. They are born brownish coloured and tend to turn more grayish coloured with age. The upper canines form sharp distinctive tusks that curve outward and upward. Compared to other artiodactyles, their head is relatively long, pointed, and free of warts. Their head and body length ranges from 0.9 to 1.8 m and they can weigh between 50 and 350 kg. Pigs are intelligent and can be trained to perform numerous tasks and tricks. Recently, they have enjoyed a measure of popularity as house pets, particularly the dwarf breeds. (credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pig)

Notes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duroc_(pig)

No species ID suggestions

2 Comments

JackEng
JackEng 2 years ago

C.Sydes,
Thanks for your additional and interesting info on the Duroc-crossbreeds...
We were told this pair were not siblings, but were born at same time...
These two definitely personified "cuteness."

C.Sydes
C.Sydes 2 years ago

I think these cuties are Duroc type piglets but probably crossbred as evidenced by the white patches. The Duroc breed is typically a tall sturdy pig with a rich brown colour, with or without black spots, although I understand a White Duroc breed has been developed.

Florida, USA

Lat: 25.54, Long: -80.49

Spotted on Mar 3, 2012
Submitted on Mar 5, 2012

Reference

Related spottings

cerdo común Indian Wild Boar Wild boar Wild boar

Nearby spottings

Turkey (Domestic) Ackee (or Akee) Goat (Domestic) Monarch chrysalis