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Least Bittern

Ixobrychus exilis

Description:

Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) stealthily foraging among the plants along the water's edge. << They mainly eat fish and insects, which they capture with quick jabs of their bill while climbing through marsh plants. ... The Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) is a small wading bird, the smallest heron found in the Americas. This bird's underparts and throat are white with light brown streaks. Their face and the sides of the neck are light brown; they have yellow eyes and a yellow bill. The adult male is glossy greenish black on the back and crown; the adult female is glossy brown on these parts. They show light brown parts on the wings in flight. >>

Habitat:

Wetlands: Green Cay Wetlands, Boynton Beach, Florida.

Notes:

The Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis) is a small wading bird, the smallest heron found in the Americas. This bird's underparts and throat are white with light brown streaks. Their face and the sides of the neck are light brown; they have yellow eyes and a yellow bill. The adult male is glossy greenish black on the back and crown; the adult female is glossy brown on these parts. They show light brown parts on the wings in flight. These birds nest in large marshes with dense vegetation from southern Canada to northern Argentina. The nest is a well-concealed platform built from cattails and other marsh vegetation. The female lays 4 or 5 eggs. Both parents feed the young by regurgitating food. A second brood is often produced in a season. These birds migrate from the northern parts of their range in winter for the southernmost coasts of the United States and areas further south, travelling at night. They mainly eat fish and insects, which they capture with quick jabs of their bill while climbing through marsh plants. The numbers of these birds have declined in some areas due to loss of habitat. They are still fairly common, but more often heard than seen. They prefer to escape on foot and hide than to take flight. These birds make cooing and clucking sounds, usually in early morning or near dusk. (credit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Least_Bitte...)

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6 Comments

JackEng
JackEng 9 years ago

blaise,
Thank you!

JackEng
JackEng 9 years ago

Mary, Birding For Fun -
Thank you! Your comments are always appreciated.
I was fortunate to get a good glimpse and decent images of this most reclusive bird. I usually hear the Least Bittern - rather than see it.

Birding For Fun
Birding For Fun 9 years ago

Great photos.

MaryEvans2
MaryEvans2 9 years ago

Beautiful captures - and great information.

JackEng
JackEng 9 years ago

Melissa,
Thank you! Always glad to "show and tell" folks about the fauna and flora in Florida.

MelissaFerguson
MelissaFerguson 9 years ago

Awesome spotting and photo's! Great information too! Thank you very much for posting to Florida's Florida & Fauna mission!

JackEng
Spotted by
JackEng

Delray Beach, Florida, USA

Spotted on Apr 17, 2012
Submitted on Apr 21, 2012

Reference

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