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Sea Hare eggs

Aplysia sp

1 Species ID Suggestions

HemaShah
HemaShah 9 years ago
Sea Hare eggs
Aplysia sp


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17 Comments

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

It's Cindy's question about the salt water that lead to the solution!! Great team work on everybody's part :))

BluberryLiLi
BluberryLiLi 9 years ago

Emma thanks so much for solving this mystery for me!!!!

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

Blueberry .you must update the ID . Thanks.

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

Thanks Cindy! It is always combined efforts!

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

Emma, I think you nailed the ID. Great job!

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

http://www.southernshores.auz.info/beach...
These eggs look similar to yours and they are the eggs of a Sea hare which is a herbivorous sea slug.

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

and also the water in inter tidal zones is not always salty, but varies from fresh water to salty..
" Water is available regularly with the tides but varies from fresh with rain to highly saline and dry salt with drying between tidal inundations." - wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intertidal_...

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

CIndy,
at least the eggs of Cane toad are tolerant to low concentration of salt water.

Reproductive habitat: The cane toad has been shown to exhibit a preference for laying eggs in shallow pools with gentle slopes and little bankside vegetation, both in parts of its native range and in Australia, and will also breed in slow-flowing rivers and streams. Cane toads breed in both permanent and temporary water bodies, although may prefer the latter. The cane toad is exceptional among anurans in possessing eggs and larvae that are tolerant to low concentrations of salt water.
http://online-field-guide.com/Chaunusmar...

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

BluberryLiLi, you said this was intertidal so I'm guessing this spotting was exposed to salt water regularly. If so, Emma, do Toads lay eggs in salt water?

If this spotting was at nearby fresh water, then they may be from a Toad.

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

I think these are American toad eggs.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/vickisnatur...

Hema  Shah
Hema Shah 9 years ago

Toads lay their eggs in strips. Frogs lay their eggs in clusters.

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

I agree, they look like eggs. Sorry I don't know which. There are a couple missions you can add this to: Southern California Wildlife http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/7964... and California Coastal Wildlife Watch http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/4975...

BluberryLiLi
BluberryLiLi 9 years ago

Intertidal mission bay San Diego. I don't think it's worms, maybe eggs of some sort. I don't even know how to begin researching it.

MartinL
MartinL 9 years ago

Is this on the beach?
Are these mollusc eggs?

Nicholas4
Nicholas4 9 years ago

Worms? very pretty!

harsuame
harsuame 9 years ago

Cool!

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

Where was this found? It looks wet.

BluberryLiLi
Spotted by
BluberryLiLi

San Diego, Mexico

Spotted on Apr 25, 2012
Submitted on Apr 26, 2012

Spotted for Mission

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