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White-Backed Vulture

Gyps africanus

Description:

The white-backed vulture (Gyps africanus) is an Old World vulture in the family Accipitridae, which also includes eagles, kites, buzzards and hawks. It is closely related to the European griffon vulture, G. fulvus. Sometimes it is called African white-backed vulture to distinguish it from the Oriental white-backed vulture—nowadays usually called white-rumped vulture—to which it was formerly believed to be closely related. The white-backed vulture is a typical vulture, with only down feathers on the head and neck, very broad wings and short tail feathers. It has a white neck ruff. The adult’s whitish back contrasts with the otherwise dark plumage. Juveniles are largely dark. This is a medium-sized vulture; its body mass is 4.2 to 7.2 kilograms (9.3–15.9 lb), it is 78 to 98 cm (31 to 39 in) long and has a 1.96 to 2.25 m (6 to 7 ft) wingspan. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-back...)

Habitat:

Like other vultures it is a scavenger, feeding mostly from carcasses of animals which it finds by soaring over savannah. It also takes scraps from human habitations. It often moves in flocks. It breeds in trees on the savannah of west and east Africa, laying one egg. The population is mostly resident. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-back...)

Notes:

Spotted in Kruger National Park, South Africa.

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1 Comment

James McNair
James McNair 6 years ago

Magnificent

Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality, Limpopo, South Africa

Spotted on Nov 18, 2010
Submitted on Nov 18, 2014

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