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Dark-lined Fire Worm

Chloeia fusca

Description:

Fire worms, also called bristle worms, are called such thanks to the poison found in the hollow hairs on their bodies. This provides protection against predators in a way similar to the irritant hairs on many caterpillar species.

Notes:

I saw several of these during a night dive at Dayang Beach, Talikud Island. This one I spotted at a depth of around 10m. They look like flattened caterpillars and burrow into the sand.

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37 Comments (1–25)

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thanks, Cindy and Kei!

Kei Heyns
Kei Heyns 9 years ago

Wonderful series Blogie!

Amazing!

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thanks, Harsha and Karen! :)

KarenL
KarenL 9 years ago

Awesome spot Blogie!

Harsha Singh
Harsha Singh 9 years ago

Blogie you drowned a caterpillar! Haha.. This is so beautiful. Those tiny feather like structures make it amazing.

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thanks, rat.tumour and AshishNimkar!

Ashish Nimkar
Ashish Nimkar 9 years ago

Super spotting..!!

The bristle worms I was handling on the Greek island of Kos (a different species to this one Blogie found) don't have much of a sting: You don't feel it at the time and later on it just felt a bit like a rash of faint nettle stings if that

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thank you very much, Mayra, williefromwi and Gerardo! :)

Gerardo Aizpuru
Gerardo Aizpuru 9 years ago

Wow fantastic great shots as usual Blogie!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

fantastic

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 9 years ago

Wow! Incredible!!

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thanks, coti1 & manuelap1!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 9 years ago

Good discussion guys. :)

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Thanks, Jolly!

Btw, since you take underwater photos as well, I'd like to invite you to be part of the Philippine Coral Survey mission. Here's the link:

http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8644...

Jolly Ibañez
Jolly Ibañez 9 years ago

Take a look at this one http://reefguide.org/chloeiafusca.html

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Let's console ourselves with the realization that even scientists themselves sometimes disagree on nomenclature, species classification, distribution and all that! :D

Jolly Ibañez
Jolly Ibañez 9 years ago

Ok. I think you got it. The sites that I've seen has conflicting reports.

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Jolly, I doubt very much that EOL's species distribution data are 100% accurate, or that a species won't be found anywhere outside what EOL declares. This is because they are entirely dependent on people submitting information to their databases. Even they themselves say that their records "may not represent the entire distribution." So, if it's on the sole basis of distribution, I don't think we can make a case for C. viridis here, nor a case against C. fusca.

Pending more data, I'll keep this spotting under Chloeia fusca for the time being.

Jolly Ibañez
Jolly Ibañez 9 years ago

Here's a link to show the range of C. viridis. http://eol.org/pages/459292/maps

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

Hi Jolly. I've seen pictures of C. viridis and they don't seem to match my spotting. On the other hand, take a look at the link below -- it shows C. fusca spotted in the Philippines:

http://www.richard-seaman.com/Underwater...

What do you think?

Jolly Ibañez
Jolly Ibañez 9 years ago

This could be Chloeia viridis because C. fusca is found somewhere in Africa.

Jolly Ibañez
Jolly Ibañez 9 years ago

Well adorned worm! Very beautiful!

Blogie
Blogie 9 years ago

I do believe you've nailed it, ArgyBee! :)

Blogie
Spotted by
Blogie

Davao Del Norte, Philippines

Spotted on May 26, 2012
Submitted on May 28, 2012

Reference

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