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Pointed or hooked lip of the black rhinoceros

Diceros bicornis

Description:

An adult black rhinoceros stands 132–180 cm (52–71 in) high at the shoulder and is 2.8–3.8 m (9.2–12 ft) in length, plus a tail of about 60 cm (24 in) in length.[7] An adult typically weighs from 800 to 1,400 kg (1,800 to 3,100 lb), however unusually large male specimens have been reported at up to 2,199–2,896 kg (4,850–6,380 lb).[5] The females are smaller than the males. Two horns on the skull are made of keratin with the larger front horn typically 50 cm (20 in) long, exceptionally up to 140 cm (55 in). Although the rhino was referred to as black, it is actually more of a grey/brown/white color in appearance.

Habitat:

he black rhinoceros or hook-lipped rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis), is a species of rhinoceros, native to the eastern and central areas of Africa including Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroon, South Africa, Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Angola.

Notes:

This looks more like a narrow mouth rhino from whatever is seen. Their thick-layered skin protects the rhino from thorns and sharp grasses. Their skin harbors external parasites, such as mites and ticks, which are eaten by oxpeckers and egrets that live with the rhino. Such behaviour was originally thought to be an example of mutualism, but recent evidence suggests that oxpeckers may be parasites instead, feeding on rhino blood.[9] Black rhinos have poor eyesight, relying more on hearing and smell. Their ears possess a relatively wide rotational range to detect sounds. An excellent sense of smell alerts rhinos to the presence of predators.

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2 Comments

Smith'sZoo
Smith'sZoo 8 years ago

Majestic animal! Please add your amazing pics to "Rhino Horn is Not Medicine" mission to help raise awareness!
http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/1284...

ShriPatwardhan
Spotted by
ShriPatwardhan

Limpopo, South Africa

Spotted on May 22, 2010
Submitted on May 30, 2012

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Reference