Guardian Nature School Team Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global community of nature enthusiasts
photographing and learning about wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Project Noah Nature School visit nature school

ruby-throated hummingbird

Archilochus colubris

Description:

The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is 7–9 cm (2.8–3.5 in) long and has a 8–11 cm (3.1–4.3 in) wingspan. Weight can range from 2 to 6 g (0.071 to 0.21 oz), with males averaging 3.4 g (0.12 oz) against the slightly larger female which averages 3.8 g (0.13 oz).[2][3] Adults are metallic green above and greyish white below, with near-black wings. Their bill is long, straight and very slender. The adult male has a ruby red throat patch which may appear black in some lighting, and a dark forked tail. The female has a dark rounded tail with white tips and generally no throat patch, though she may sometimes have a light or whitish throat patch. The male is smaller than the female, and has a slightly shorter beak. A molt of feathers occurs once a year, and begins during the autumn migration.

Habitat:

The breeding habitat is throughout most of eastern North America and the Canadian prairies, in deciduous and pine forests and forest edges, orchards, and gardens. The female builds a nest in a protected location in a shrub or a tree. The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is migratory spending most of the winter in southern Mexico, Central America as far south as South America, and the West Indies. It breeds throughout the eastern United States, east of the 100th meridian, and in southern Canada in eastern and mixed deciduous forest.[5] seen mostly in winter, in Mexico.

Notes:

In the forth and fifth photo we have a male. Both are the same bird, and were taken seconds apart. Please notice that the Ruby red throat is more visible when he turns his throat into the sun, and it appears dark to mostly black when it is not at the proper angle. More times then not, the males throat will appear to be dark or black when you spot them.

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

23 Comments

williefromwi
williefromwi 8 years ago

Thanks for the comment sriyaprasanna

sriyaprasanna
sriyaprasanna 9 years ago

beauuuutiful

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

New notes just added to help show the males throat appearing red when turned into the sun, and black when its head is turned ever so slightly away from the sun.

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you Chief RedEarth and MayraSpringmann

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 9 years ago

Great capture! Congratulations!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you IvanDuran,

IvánDurán
IvánDurán 9 years ago

Nice shot!!!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

CarolSnowMilne, I am thrilled I could share these with you and the worldwide ProjectNoah family.

CarolSnowMilne
CarolSnowMilne 9 years ago

Another great hummingbird series.

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you evenlake, I had heard hummingbirds in my yard for a few days now, I finally got a spotting of them, and will probably be putting up photos from that spotting in a day or two.

evenlake
evenlake 9 years ago

Outstanding!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thanks for the glowing comments, Naturesrealm

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you Matthew

MatthewCollison
MatthewCollison 9 years ago

Beautiful job, William. Sublime photos!!!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you so much for taking the time to comment on my spotting Adarsha.Joisa. I am thrilled I can share them with you and others, and am very happy you like them.

adarsha.joisa
adarsha.joisa 9 years ago

brilliant pics! good one!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you Carol, for the wonderful comment............................................................
Emma, we actually had a sighting of a Rufus here in Wisconsin last year. I am glad I could share my spotting and photos with you and the project noah family. Hummingbirds are both fun to watch and try to photograph. ........................................................................................................................
Gracias, lo único que capturó su belleza, Harsuame

Hema
Hema 9 years ago

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/601...
this is the Annas we have here. They are very abundant and as you can see the color of the gorget is probably the main difference.

harsuame
harsuame 9 years ago

Preciosas series!! felicidades

Hema
Hema 9 years ago

Thanks for sharing your precious pics. I love hummingbirds and these are simply adorable.
We have the Annas Hummingbirds on the west coast. They are quite similar.
I love the Ruby red in your spotting.
WE have migratory Rufous hummingbirds which are truly stunning. They are truly wild and quite difficult to get a picture of. i had one at the feeder and I will always cherish that moment ,along with the feeder!!

CarolSnowMilne
CarolSnowMilne 9 years ago

The most gorgeous photos of hummingbirds I have ever seen. Wonderful!

williefromwi
williefromwi 9 years ago

Thank you NuwanChathuranga

NuwanChathuranga
NuwanChathuranga 9 years ago

lovely series !!

williefromwi
Spotted by
williefromwi

Merton, Wisconsin, USA

Spotted on May 26, 2011
Submitted on May 28, 2012

Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors

Join the Project Noah Team Join Project Noah Team