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Common Starling

Sturnus Vulgaris




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8 Comments

Crystal Simmons
Crystal Simmons 7 years ago

Oh, that is very interesting! Now I'm going to be trying to catch one;)

freelancing
freelancing 7 years ago

From my understanding, these birds were pets - brought here as pet songbirds. Enough of them have gotten loose to really take over in the cities. There is a book called "Arnie the Darling Starling" about a woman who found a bald chick outside her barn and took care of it. It turned out to be a starling and learned to talk... apparently sound mimicry is a characteristic of this species.

Crystal Simmons
Crystal Simmons 7 years ago

That's awesome! Thanks for sharing! How cool that he learned to imitate the music!

freelancing
freelancing 7 years ago

I love Starlings! I know they are not indigenous birds and are considered by many to be pests - but I just adore them. I rescued one that had been shot about 20 years ago. I kept him for about 6 months before releasing him. I worked at night and when I left, I would leave the radio on the classical station for him. One day, while I was sleeping, I awoke to a symphony in my room. I reached over to turn off the radio and it was already off. My little roommate was belting out such beautiful music. I only wish I had had something to film it with back then. He was so darling.

Crystal Simmons
Crystal Simmons 7 years ago

Thanks! They sure are!

Maria dB
Maria dB 7 years ago

The iridescent feathers are beautiful!

Crystal Simmons
Crystal Simmons 7 years ago

Thank you so much! They sure are beautiful! Sure we can be friends! I'm loving PN so far!:)

Helena K
Helena K 7 years ago

Nicely done, and welcome 2 Project Noah! The starling looks a lot like a rainbow, doesn't he? I LOVE starlings. They're such pretty birds! BTW, can we make friends on PN or what?

Crystal Simmons
Spotted by
Crystal Simmons

Texas, USA

Lat: 30.23, Long: -94.18

Spotted on Apr 27, 2012
Submitted on May 25, 2012

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