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Hollow-foot

Suillus cavipes

Notes:

A large mushroom under an evergreen tree in my parents' yard. A week later, it was nothing but sludge (last photo).

1 Species ID Suggestions



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6 Comments

Ivan Rodriguez
Ivan Rodriguez 8 years ago

Haha no problem, it's all a part of the learning process. I've done things like this with insects, for example. I just want to snap a good shot of a bug, and then people request dorsal and ventral shots and X-rays and all this nonsense. But these do indeed help, and it's just a couple of extra steps to increase your finding's chances of being identified. Well you're doing very well considering your 40 spottings are such high-quality, and just keep up the great work! Look forward to more spottings from you. :)

MeganM
MeganM 8 years ago

Yes, that is true. Thanks again for the ID help. And yes, I was just telling my boyfriend that it's too bad the photos I have taken the past 5 years or so (since I got my first point-and-shoot camera) were not for the purpose of identification, but more just "artistic" photos I did for fun. I just recently found and joined Project Noah, so only now am I more mindful of getting more photos for identification purposes. However, it's likely I have more photos floating around on my parents' computer; all I have access to right now are what I posted on facebook back then. The next time I am back home, I will look to see if I can find more ID appropriate photos of all these mushrooms I just posted.

Ivan Rodriguez
Ivan Rodriguez 8 years ago

They might also be able to be washed off by rain or other elements. But yeah, aside from the absense of the hairs typical of S. cavipes, it would be a fine match. It's funny, because people who usually take one half-decent shot of a mushroom only take one from the top view displaying the cap. But you take many incredible-quality shots, but you gotta start including a top view so identification can be even more possible! :)

MeganM
MeganM 8 years ago

Thanks so much for your help with the ID, Ivan! It looks exactly like the Suillus cavipes, but the cap was definitely smooth with no scales/hairs. Hmm..

I am not sure about Suillus americanus, simply because the top was pretty much completely brown and it didn't really have patches.

Ivan Rodriguez
Ivan Rodriguez 8 years ago

I finally remembered the better candidate I had in mind: Suillus cavipes. http://www.flickr.com/photos/53536309@N0...

Although I can't tell from your shots, was the cap smooth or did it have those few scales/hairs?

Ivan Rodriguez
Ivan Rodriguez 8 years ago

The closest guess I have at the moment is a young Suillus americanus, which is found in eastern North America but resembles S. sibiricus over here in the west. David Arora from Mushrooms Demystified mentions that there are "...scattered reddish to cinnamon-brown or dark brown spots, scales, streaks, or patches of fibrils, especially toward the margin (but these sometimes washed off by rain)..." so that could mean that this is a young species with its brown patches still intact.

MeganM
Spotted by
MeganM

Council Bluffs, Iowa, USA

Spotted on Aug 4, 2009
Submitted on Jun 28, 2012

Spotted for Mission

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