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Ptiloscola wellingi

Ptiloscola wellingi

Description:

Silk moth (saturniids ), found resting on wall early in the morning (just past sunrise). Likely attracted to the florescent lighting. With thanks to Bill Oehlke, who identified this specimen for me.

Habitat:

Low coastal jungle

Notes:

I have been unable to find any living images of this species other than my own; I have them posted with Bill Oehlke's World's Largest Saturnid Site (by subscription) and have posted them here to hopefully help anyone else who encounters this lovely species of silk moth.

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4 Comments

Nina C. Wilde
Nina C. Wilde 9 years ago

Even experts make errors sometimes... Me, I am just a hobby lepidopterist. I've had a great deal of help from some awesome professionals too; bob patterson at mpg and Eric Eaton who is the author of a popular insect field guide. Please double check my work too! I've made some glaring mistakes with IDs in the past. That's the nice thing about a site like this; we are self correcting when better information appears.

bayucca
bayucca 9 years ago

I have also thought of joining his site, but did not find to time to do it and then forgot again. I have a special relationship with Bill. He cross-checked quite a lot of moths ID I did (hein, IDidid...) for a flickr friend. The first one was completely wrong and I already thought this would be the ultimate nightmare and all my other IDs were also wrong. I was happy to hear from Bill, that this 1st one was the only wrong one... One problem with moths is the fact, that most people do not dare to make an ID because they feel not experienced enough for that. In the meanwhile my inhibition threshold is quite low, however, 1 or 2 years ago I personally was sometimes not very careful with IDs, was just happy when I saw one which was similar. But getting the right family is sometimes already half the battle. With your moth it would take quite an effort and time for me to get down to genus and even more the species. So, please, be patient with me and re-check all my suggestions...

Nina C. Wilde
Nina C. Wilde 9 years ago

Yes, I was looking it the totally wrong family--in looking at the pinned specimens for the rest of Ptiloscola, it certainly does fit. Bill has helped me quite a few times, and I figured I should pay back, literally, by joining his site. I also have allowed him to use my images--Enyo gorgon gorgon and this one. He's been quite generous with his time. I have to give many thanks to all the volunteer naturalists who've helped me over the years. I try to return the favor too.

bayucca
bayucca 9 years ago

Very nice spotting. At first sight I would have thought of a Lasiocampidae. In my eyes it is quite a strange pose for a Saturniidae. But I certainly would never question an ID from Bill.

Nina C. Wilde
Spotted by
Nina C. Wilde

Quintana Roo, Mexico

Spotted on Dec 29, 2009
Submitted on Jun 26, 2012

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