Los peces aguja o peces pipa son una subfamilia de peces syngnathiformes de la familia Syngnathidae, como los caballitos de mar. Miden de 25 a 300 mm. Es ovovivíparo y el macho transporta los huevos en una bolsa ventral, la cual se encuentra debajo de la cola. La hembra le transfiere los huevos en un "abrazo nupcial" de 30 segundos. Se desarrollan rápidamente: en 70 días llegan a 5 cm y a los 90 días ya alcanzan la madurez sexual. Viven de dos a tres años."/>
Guardian Nature School Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Nature School For Teachers - Fall 2020 Launch! visit nature school

Pipefish. Pez Aguja

Syngnathus abaster

Description:

Needlefish are a subfamily of syngnathiformes fish of the Syngnathidae family, such as seahorses. They measure from 25 to 300 mm. It is ovoviviparous and the male carries the eggs in a ventral bag, which is under the tail. The female transfers the eggs in a "bridal hug" of 30 seconds. They develop quickly - in 70 days they reach 5 cm and the 90 days already reach sexual maturity. They live for two to three years.
Los peces aguja o peces pipa son una subfamilia de peces syngnathiformes de la familia Syngnathidae, como los caballitos de mar. Miden de 25 a 300 mm. Es ovovivíparo y el macho transporta los huevos en una bolsa ventral, la cual se encuentra debajo de la cola. La hembra le transfiere los huevos en un "abrazo nupcial" de 30 segundos. Se desarrollan rápidamente: en 70 días llegan a 5 cm y a los 90 días ya alcanzan la madurez sexual. Viven de dos a tres años.

Habitat:

Salt-water coastal lagoon of Mar Menor (Murcia, Spain).
Laguna costera salada del Mar Menor (Murcia. España).

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

5 Comments

AshleyT
AshleyT 2 years ago

Your spotting has been nominated for the Spotting of the Week. The winner will be chosen by the Project Noah Rangers based on a combination of factors including: uniqueness of the shot, status of the organism (for example, rare or endangered), quality of the information provided in the habitat and description sections. There is a subjective element, of course; the spotting with the highest number of Ranger votes is chosen. Congratulations on being nominated!

eulalia rubio
eulalia rubio 2 years ago

Thanks, Jim.

Jim Nelson
Jim Nelson 2 years ago

Interesting spotting, and well done photos!

eulalia rubio
eulalia rubio 2 years ago


Thanks for completing the information.

Isabela
Isabela 2 years ago

Great series of this little fish which is "cousin" to the seahorse. Its reproduction is similar to those. It's the male which carries the fertilized eggs in specialized pouches on its body (you can see it clearly in photo n. 4 of this series). The eggs mature in this pouch, and the young are expelled through a longitudinal slit in the front of the pouch.

eulalia rubio
Spotted by
eulalia rubio

San Javier, Región de Murcia, Spain

Spotted on Sep 9, 2018
Submitted on Sep 9, 2018

Related Spottings

Northern Pipefish Greater Pipefish Aguja Pipefish. Pez aguja

Nearby Spottings

Long-snouted seahorse. Caballito de mar Rockpool shrimp. Quisquilla Cangrejo. Crab Cerithium
Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors