Guardian Nature School Team Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global community of nature enthusiasts
photographing and learning about wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Project Noah Nature School visit nature school

Pandora Sphinx Moth

Eumorpha pandorus

Description:

First described in 1806 by Jacob Hübner as Daphnis pandorus (In relation to the Asian counterpart, Daphnis nerii), the Pandora Sphinx Moth, Eumorpha pandorus, is a lovely olive green moth, with darker green patterning on the inside of the forewing, around the head, and lower on the forewing. There are sometimes pink marks near the body of the moth and on the hind wing. The hindwing is mainly white with a black spot, usually in a blotchy pattern.

Habitat:

Larvae, which are quite variably colored, feed on: Grape and Virginia Creeper

Notes:

This was #1 on my moth hunting (no kill) list! I cannot believe I saw it! My friend called me yesterday and said she found a huge moth at her house yesterday. She texted me a photo and I identified it for her, and told her if she finds it again, she could let me know. Sure enough, she found this and another sphinx moth (Sphinx kalmiae, I believe) again tonight. She offered to bring them over, and when I saw them, I was amazed! The moth is so amazing! This moth won the Winkflash Nighttime Photo Contest, which ended August 28th, 2012. Thanks to all who voted!

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

41 Comments (1–25)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Karen, thank you so much for featuring this moth for the fun fact! It's one of my most favorite finds so far!

KarenL
KarenL 7 years ago

Fun fact! There are more than 11,000 moth species in the U.S. alone! https://upload.facebook.com/projectnoah/...

You can help us document them by participating in National Moth Week, July 19 – 27 2014. You can learn more and sign up here http://nationalmothweek.org/registration...



Uday
Uday 9 years ago

:)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks again, Uday! No problem!

Uday
Uday 9 years ago

welcome!
btw thanks for following me :)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks so much, Uday! I was surprised you liked the second photo the best! I thought it had a tad too much exposure! Thanks again for your nice comment!

Uday
Uday 9 years ago

nice series
loved second pic most!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks, Fyn!

Fyn  Kynd
Fyn Kynd 9 years ago

Cool!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks Noel and António!

Noel Buensuceso
Noel Buensuceso 9 years ago

Congratulations J!

Congrats J :)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

This moth won the Winkflash Nighttime Photo Contest, which ended August 28th, 2012. Thanks to all who voted!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks so much, Argy!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 9 years ago

Fabulous moth and nice shots too J.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks, Neil! I'm glad you liked my mini research paper! :)

NeilDazet
NeilDazet 9 years ago

Awesome spotting Jake! I love the photos and the descriptive notes!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thank you, Mayra!

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 9 years ago

Fabulous!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

After more research, finding the gender of sphinx moths seems very difficult. It seems like a pinned specimen would be ideal to find the gender, though I will submit to www.BugGuide.net, and see if they will be able to help. Thanks again, Karen!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks Karen! I'll do some looking into that! Thanks again!

KarenL
KarenL 9 years ago

Hi Jacob, only males have both an undivided frenular hook and a retinaculum. Also all male hawk moths have a partial comb of hairs along their antennae (from Wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sphingidae)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Does anyone know how to tell if the Pandora Sphinx Moth is a male or a female? I know antennae is a common indicator, but sphinx moths really don't have much of a variation on the antennae. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 9 years ago

Thanks, Louisa! It was definitely something not to forget!

Louisa
Louisa 9 years ago

Congrats on spotting #1 on your moth list! Awesome!

Jacob Gorneau
Spotted by
Jacob Gorneau

New York, USA

Spotted on Jul 19, 2012
Submitted on Jul 20, 2012

Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors

Join the Project Noah Team Join Project Noah Team