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Clearwing moth (mimics wasp)

Trichura cerberus

Description:

Brightly colored blue and black day flying clearwing moth with extension on abdomen similar in appearance to ichneumon wasp. In a similar species, Trichura cerberus, the male has the abdominal appendage, and the wings are edged in a thick black line, with a black line bisecting the wings

Habitat:

On exposed sunny hillside along the path at the viewpoint for 1000 foot falls

Notes:

As I was getting close to photograph this moth, our guide was making noises about I shouldn't get close to it, that I was braver than he was.The other couple on the trip with us was thrilled by the find and photographed it after I did, but their little camera didn't have the capability, so at lunch my camera got handed around as we made the decision this was lepidoptera.

1 Species ID Suggestions

bayucca
bayucca 8 years ago
Clearwing Moth
Trichura sp.


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51 Comments (1–25)

Saturniidae27
Saturniidae27 a year ago

Looks pretty much identical to Trichura nr. esmeralda.
Please check this link :)
http://v3.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxb...

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

And some cropping too

rubens.luciano
rubens.luciano 8 years ago

Nice macro!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Now we need to match-make! LOL. The wings on mine were clearer than in the website, or of the female, but beyond that, I'm willing to call it a match. And the female was in Honduras - not too far from Belize! And thank you!

bayucca
bayucca 8 years ago

Hey, Karen, take a look at this one!!
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/186...

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Uploaded photo with slightly better contrast

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Thank you Larry! I wish we had such colorful critters in Oregon! Guess I just have to leave every winter.

LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 8 years ago

Great color blue spotting Karen!!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

another enlargement

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Thank you all, it was definitely one of my all time favs

Lovely spotting and photo!

Adarsha B S
Adarsha B S 8 years ago

Wonderful spotting Saxton!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Thank you!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 8 years ago

Super series and spotting Karen.

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Thank you!

chebeague8
chebeague8 8 years ago

nice pic!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

swapped photos around, placing the enlargement Bayucca requested as first

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

I'm not convinced either. there is something beyond the heavy black lines.... and the only email I have is for whatsthatbug whatsthatbug.com@gmail.com

bayucca
bayucca 8 years ago

Cool, Trichura is safe! Uff! But I am not convinced yet about Cerberus. There are no reports for Cerberus from Central America. There are Druryi, Latifasciata and Esmeralda from your aera. I try to get closer. Do you have the mail address from Julian?

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Thanks Carol! I think so too :)

Carol Milne
Carol Milne 8 years ago

Very cool!

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

From what bug is this:
Arctiid expert Julian Donahue confirms your genus, not family, Trichura taxonomy.
Julian Donahue responds
Ctenuchid for sure. Members of the genus Trichura appear to mimic Pepsis tarantula wasps, with that posterior appendage that looks like the trailing legs of a wasp. About 15 species are currently placed in Trichura, some without the terminal appendage (but maybe described from specimens that had lost it?), but this one is most likely T. cerberus (which is supposed to have a wider forewing discal bar than shows in the photo) or T. druryi, originally described as lacking the caudal appendage, both of which occur in Central America. As in most ctenuchid genera, this genus has not been subject to a modern taxonomic revision.
Curiously, the sesiid genus Alcathoe has a similar caudal appendage, and also mimics Pepsis wasps.
Julian

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

cool! And I didn't mention PN in my post to them. Should I have?

bayucca
bayucca 8 years ago

Me too! This is my personal fate... The crop is fine. I have some historical descriptions. I hope I can follow them. Need first to get knowledge about what they are talking about.

KarenSaxton
KarenSaxton 8 years ago

Really? I may yet get an ID on this one? I had hoped very much for a clearwing moth on this trip, and was thrilled to get this one. Now I want to know "who" he is.

KarenSaxton
Spotted by
KarenSaxton

Cayo, Belize

Spotted on Dec 27, 2012
Submitted on Jan 15, 2013

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