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Blackhaw Viburnum

Viburnum prunifolium

Notes:

(I'm not an expert nor a doctor. I may not have even identified the correct plant. Information purposes only!) From the wiki - Like many other plants, including many food plants and those used as culinary herbs, black haw contains salicin, a chemical relative of aspirin. Those who are allergic to that substance should not use black haw.[4] In addition, due to the connection between aspirin and Reye's syndrome, young people or people afflicted with a viral disease should not use black haw. (I'm not an expert nor a doctor. I may not have even identified the correct plant. Information purposes only!) From the wiki - The chemicals in black haw do relax the uterus and therefore probably prevent miscarriage; however, the salicin may be teratogenic. Consequently, pregnant women should not use black haw in the first two trimesters.[6] Furthermore, anyone using herbs for medical reasons should only use them under the supervision of a qualified medical professional.

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StacyH
Spotted by
StacyH

Houston, Texas, USA

Spotted on May 11, 2015
Submitted on Nov 9, 2015

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