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Western Gray Squirrel

Sciurus griseus

2 Species ID Suggestions

Liam
Liam 8 years ago
Fox squirrel
Sciurus niger Fox squirrel


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12 Comments

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

According to Elaine,
The Eastern Gray Squirrel differs from the Delmarva Fox Squirrel in several ways: Fox squirrel tails can reach 15" while the Gray Squirrel is about 15". Delmarva Fox Squirrels weigh between one/one and a half to three pounds; Gray Squirrel is about half that weight. The Delmarva is stubby-necked with shorter, thicker, more rounded ears which set slightly further back on the head. Gray Squirrel's ears are taller and more pointed; their necks are thinner. Delmarvas are slower, more deliberate in motion and less agile and spend a great deal of time on the ground.

The ears in the pictures seem to be pointed and the face is longer. The rusty brown fur on face, tail, feet and back along with the pointed ears are indicative of Gray Squirrel.
Great feed back Elaine. Will update accordingly!!Tricky one!

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

Thanks Viv, I will have to ask the Mt Diablo interpretive society. This is a very unusual coloring compared to the tons I have seen here.
Could be a Gray. I thought it is a little too big to be a gray.

VivBraznell
VivBraznell 8 years ago

http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/193... This is another spotting from another area Jemma. If you look at the tail colouring and shape in image 2 they are very different to your spotting

VivBraznell
VivBraznell 8 years ago

Face shape and ears looks different to my spotting Jemma. Need to ask an expert

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 8 years ago

I am glad I could help, Jemma! The Eastern Gray Squirrel and the Fox Squirrel are both not native to California but have been introduced in urban areas in California. Sorry for the late responses, my notifications are not working at the moment, so feel free to email me if you don't get a reply from me at any time. :-)

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

Thank you for the feed back. This is a very unusual squirrel for our area!

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 8 years ago

Hi Jemma, this ID needs to be confirmed. I am absolutely not 100% sure about this one. I think the stomach on Sciurus niger is much too orange for this to be Sciurus niger (http://www.greglasley.net/nonBirds/foxsq...). As for Sciurus niger cinereus, I think this squirrel looks a little smaller, and there isn't a hint of orange present (http://www2.stetson.edu/~pmay/fox%20squi...). The Western Gray Squirrel, Sciurus griseus appears too dark of a gray. This leaves only one possibility, Sciurus carolinensis. I'm not completely sure, so you definitely might want to confirm, perhaps with an organization near you which has a focus on mammals of the area.

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

Squirrel experts,can you confirm the ID?

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

The Delmarva fox squirrel is extremely shy and is hard to detect in the field. A unique characteristic is, it is most often terrestrial and prefers to travel from tree to tree by climbing down and walking over to the next tree.
http://grad.uic.edu/gallery/main.php?g2_...

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

liam,is there any possibility that this could be a fox squirrel sub species?,
Sciurus niger cinereus?
http://ecos.fws.gov/speciesProfile/profi...

Hema
Hema 8 years ago

Liam ,any possibility at all it is a western gray squirrel? I have never seen so much white in a fox.

Hema
Spotted by
Hema

Walnut Creek, California, USA

Spotted on Mar 25, 2013
Submitted on Mar 25, 2013

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