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Unidentified Wasp

Description:

Observed on the shoreline in coarse sand. Approximately 1 inch long. Note the modified hind femur.

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11 Comments

Small Wonders
Small Wonders 8 years ago

Thanks John - I will continue to research. I appreciate your help with this!

John La Salle
John La Salle 8 years ago

I got a message from my colleague about this. Best we can offer at this point is Leucospis - it fits closer there than anywhere else. However it is not a very typical species.

Small Wonders
Small Wonders 8 years ago

John -
Once again, thanks for your time & your help. I am at a dead end myself.

John La Salle
John La Salle 8 years ago

Small Wonders -
I tried to identify this with the last key to Leucospid genera (Boucek 1974). There are only two genera known from the New World (Leucospis, Polistomorpha), and this doesn't appear to me to be either. Certainly not Polistomorpha which doesn't have the curved ovipositor. There are also a couple of African genera, but these don't seem to fit either.
I have passed a link to the picture on to a friend who has more experience with this group than I do, and he can hopefully shed some light on it.

Small Wonders
Small Wonders 8 years ago

John, thanks again for your help!
I will try to key as well.

John La Salle
John La Salle 8 years ago

Yes, it is certainly different from the "normal" Leucospis - which is the most common genus.
John Noyes has produced an on-line catalogue to all chalcids.
http://www.nhm.ac.uk/research-curation/r...
There are 4 described genera in this family. I can try to check a key later in the day.

Small Wonders
Small Wonders 8 years ago

Thanks John for your help. I'm quite certain on Chalcid & likely Leucospidae, yet this wasp is very unique to the Leucospidae species, that parasitize my leafcutter bee nests every year, here in North America; it is very large (24 mm) & lacking the typical coloration of the recorded species here.

Small Wonders
Small Wonders 8 years ago

Gracias Luis!

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 8 years ago

Wow John La Salle! With your info I'm looking to an entire new spotting now.

John La Salle
John La Salle 8 years ago

Chalcidoidea: Leucospidae.
Very nice picture of an unusual wasp. Members of this family can generally be recognized by a lack of any closed cells in the front wing, an enlarged and toothed hind femur, and the ovipositor wrapping up over the abdomen. You can see the tip of the ovipositor extending past the front of the abdoment between the wings.

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 8 years ago

Excellent shot Small Wonders!

Small Wonders
Spotted by
Small Wonders

Mexico

Spotted on Feb 20, 2013
Submitted on Mar 5, 2013

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