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Loblolly Pine

Pinus taeda

Description:

An economically important tree for lumber & pulp wood purposes. The trees reach a height of 30–35 m (98–115 ft) with a diameter of 0.4–1.5 m (1.3–4.9 ft). Exceptional specimens may reach 50 m (160 ft) tall, the largest of the southern pines. Its needles are in bundles of three, sometimes twisted, and measure 12–22 cm (4.7–8.7 in) long; an intermediate length for southern pines, shorter than those of the longleaf pine or slash pine, but longer than those of the shortleaf pine and spruce pine. The needles usually last up to two years before they fall, which gives the species its evergreen character. Although some needles fall throughout the year due to severe weather, insect damage, and drought, most needles fall during the autumn and winter of their second year. The seed cones are green, ripening pale buff-brown, 7–13 cm (2.8–5.1 in) in length, 2–3 cm (0.79–1.2 in) broad when closed, opening to 4–6 cm (1.6–2.4 in) wide, each scale bearing a sharp 3–6 mm spine.[2][5]

Habitat:

Native to the Southeastern United States, from central Texas east to Florida, and north to Delaware and Southern New Jersey. Loblolly pines grow well in acidic clay soil, which is common throughout the South, and are thus often found in large stands in rural places.

Notes:

Spotted along a hiking trail at Camp Windy Waters on Lake Allatoona

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QWMom
Spotted by
QWMom

Georgia, USA

Spotted on Mar 23, 2013
Submitted on Mar 26, 2013

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