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Kumquat blossom

Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensu lato

Description:

The kumquat tree is slow-growing, shrubby, compact, 8 to 15 ft (2.4-4.5 m) tall, the branches light-green and angled when young, thornless or with a few spines. The apparently simple leaves are alternate, lanceolate, 1 1/4 to 3 3/8 in (3.25-8.6 cm) long, finely toothed from the apex to the middle, dark-green, glossy above, lighter beneath. Sweetly fragrant, 5-parted, white flowers are borne singly or 1 to 4 together in the leaf axils. The fruit is oval-oblong or round, 5/8 to 1 1/2 in (1.6-4 cm) wide; peel is golden-yellow to reddish-orange, with large, conspicuous oil glands, fleshy, thick, tightly clinging, edible, the outer layer spicy, the inner layer sweet; the pulp is scant, in 3 to 6 segments, not very juicy, acid to subacid; contains small, pointed seeds or sometimes none; they are green within.

Habitat:

Patio pot.

Notes:

Kumquats are believed native to China. They were described in Chinese literature in 1178 A.D. A European writer in 1646 mentioned the fruit as having been described to him by a Portuguese missionary who had labored 22 years in China. In 1712, kumquats were included in a list of plants cultivated in Japan. They have been grown in Europe and North America since the mid-19th Century, mainly as ornamental dooryard trees and as potted specimens in patios and greenhouses. Kumquat trees are the most cold-hardy of the citrus family. Some varieties can endure temperatures down to 10 degrees F, but they do require a hot summer. The kumquat tree is generally grown in Florida, California and Texas. The kumquat tree provides a fruit that can be eaten raw or preserved in sugar syrup. It is a shrubby, slow-growing tree that is 8 to 15 feet tall

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joanbstanley
Spotted by
joanbstanley

Denton, Texas, USA

Spotted on Mar 26, 2013
Submitted on Mar 29, 2013

Reference

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