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Southern lapwing

vanellus chilensis

Description:

After 26 days of incubation, three new baby southern lapwings were born at our school. It was a joyful beginning of the year for all our students who got to start observing and learning further about Southern lapwings.

Habitat:

Southern lapwings have settled at our school and are breeding their young there several times throughout the year. At school we take care of them by respecting their place within ours and we observe and learn more about these wonderful birds throughout the year.

Notes:

Children learn, follow the growth and record information regarding southern lapwings in different ways. Project Noah is one of the technological tools we use during science class.

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22 Comments

patty
patty 6 years ago

I don´t think so Juli; actually it seemed quite comfortable and it even got quite apart from its mother while I was there as I try to be very still, quiet and calm. =)

patty
patty 6 years ago

yes, it is great to have them at school =)

patty
patty 6 years ago

Thank you very much Reza =)

Congratulations Patty to you and your class on this most wonderful SotD :)

patty
patty 6 years ago

Thank you Nacho; and congratulations for you too because we are all observing and recording information about the southern lapwings =)

patty
patty 6 years ago

Thank you Antonio and Sergio =)

Beautiful series Patty,congrats on the well deserved SOTD and on the great work with the students and thanks for sharing

Sergio Monteiro
Sergio Monteiro 6 years ago

Congratulations Patty.

patty
patty 6 years ago

Thank you Saumya, Dilan, chiefredearth, Mona, Noel, Mark, Daniela, Luis and Karen! =)

Congrats patty ! Cute little baby birds !

Dilan Chathuranga
Dilan Chathuranga 6 years ago

Congrats patty!cute series!!!

Congratulations Patty on your SOTD. :)) Nice!

patty
patty 6 years ago

Thank you very much. We are very happy to have the southern lapwings in our school. We always take care of them.
Neil, it is great to read that you are also protecting and trying to save birds.
Best wishes,
Form III Blue Class

Neil Ross
Neil Ross 6 years ago

Hi Patty. Congratulations on your SOTD. I love the little lapwing chicks, but I also feel a great sense of sadness too when I see them here. We have a couple of mated pairs who insist on nesting on busy roundabouts on major roads. Every chick, without fail, is killed when they nest here. I've also rescued many from storm water drains when the chicks fall through the grates. It's not the first time I've gone head-first down a drain on a rescue mission, and I usually have someone hold me feet so I don't fall in myself and get stuck. Hopefully the little guy you've spotted will fare better than the chicks I see here, although some do survive.

Mona Pirih
Mona Pirih 6 years ago

Congratulations Patty.. It's nice series..

Noel Buensuceso
Noel Buensuceso 6 years ago

Great series, Patty! Congratulations!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 6 years ago

Felicidades !!!

DB
DB 6 years ago

¡Mis felicitaciones, Patty! Divinos esos pichones de Tero, que hermosa experiencia para los nenes. :)

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 6 years ago

Felicidades Patty!

KarenL
KarenL 6 years ago

Congratulations Patty, what a wonderful opportunity you are giving your students to experience nature first hand!

A lapwing chick ventures out for the first time in our Spotting of the Day, observed by a group of elementary school children. Pupils of St. Georges School in Montevideo, Uruguay are following the development of the lapwings and sharing their photos and data with the Project Noah community.

Facebook: https://upload.facebook.com/projectnoah/...
Twitter: https://twitter.com/projectnoah/status/4...

patty
patty 6 years ago

Hello Mark and they are but not at our school because they are nesting there and we have got used to each other =)

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 6 years ago

Wonderful spotting . Different from our lapwings... but similar. Are they aggressive defenders of the chicks?

patty
Spotted by
patty

Montevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay

Spotted on Mar 13, 2014
Submitted on Mar 15, 2014

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