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Flamingo Tongue Snail

Cyphoma gibbosum

Description:

The flamingo feeds by browsing on the living tissues of the soft corals on which it lives. Common prey include Briareum spp., Gorgonia spp., Plexaura spp., and Plexaurella spp. Adult female C. gibbosum attach eggs to coral which they have recently fed upon. After roughly a week and a half, the larvae hatch. They are planktonic and eventually settle onto other gorgonian corals. Juveniles tend to remain on the underside of coral branches while adults are far more visible and mobile. Adults scrape the polyps off the coral with their radula, leaving an easily visible feeding scar on the coral. However, the corals can regrow the polyps, and therefore predation by C. gibbosum is generally not lethal.

Habitat:

Sharon's Serenity dive site in Klein Bonaire.

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11 Comments

The MnMs
The MnMs 2 years ago

Thank you! :-D

triggsturner
triggsturner 2 years ago

Wonderful image. Congratulations on your 2nd place.

SukanyaDatta
SukanyaDatta 2 years ago

Stunning shots. Congratulations.

Congrats The MnMs

Brian38
Brian38 2 years ago

Congratulations MnMs!

Sergio Monteiro
Sergio Monteiro 2 years ago

Congratulations the MnMs.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 years ago

Congratulations the MnMs, this spotting came second in our 2018 Best Wildlife Photo Competition, Others category!

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Leuba Ridgway
Leuba Ridgway 2 years ago

Spectacular shot of both snail and the Gorgonian - thanks !

DrNamgyalT.Sherpa
DrNamgyalT.Sherpa 4 years ago

That looks fantastic Marta!

The MnMs
The MnMs 4 years ago

Yes, in some other spottings in the area I have seen even bigger scars. I was surprised -and happy- to learn that the coral recovers.

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 4 years ago

Beautiful pattern! I love how you can see its effect on the coral.

The MnMs
Spotted by
The MnMs

Bonaire, Caribisch Nederland, Netherlands

Spotted on Sep 15, 2017
Submitted on Jan 4, 2018

Reference

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