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Rigidoporus laetus

Rigidoporus laetus

Description:

Small brackets about 50mm wide growing from the wet base of a very large eucalyptus tree.

Habitat:

Eucalyptus rainforest national park.

Notes:

Compare with this a year ago http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/250...
and a year before that
http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/114...
http://bie.ala.org.au/species/885839ae-b...
family: Meripilaceae genus: Rigidoporus

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15 Comments

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

Thanks again Michel. I should kick myself for not remembering previous ones.

MichelBeeckman
MichelBeeckman 7 years ago

I think you're right, Mark! Both about the Inonotus and the correct species, named Rigidoporus laetus!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

At last I think I have it. Please let me know if you don't like this ID. Thanks again everyone.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

A couple of things with Inonotus - we don't have many sp. in Australia and they always seem to be rough or furry where (both) these had a smooth or rubbery touch all over. I'll keep digging around - if it wasn't in a national park I would take a sample and get it checked. Thanks again.

MichelBeeckman
MichelBeeckman 7 years ago

You're very welcome, Mark. And, it's true about the grey pores and the flash, I see that now. The brackets you've found last year and this one could indeed be the same species, at least the same genus. I'm still thinking Inonotus, but I'm not so sure about I. hispidus.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

..I'm not sure about the grey pores. My flash can cause weirdness sometimes.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

Thanks for the input MM. Did you see this one in the same area a year ago? http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/250...

MichelBeeckman
MichelBeeckman 7 years ago

Definitely not a Laetiporus, because of the grey pores. Maybe you could try Inonotus hispidus? Here's my spotting: http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/128...
I've found some info here: http://www.first-nature.com/fungi/inonot...
But ofcourse it could also be some other Inonotus species! It kinda looks like Phaeolus schweinitzii too, but that species is a parasite of conifers.

RandyL.
RandyL. 7 years ago

I have no idea really. That bright yellow growing tip does resemble Laetiporus, but the pore surface seems off for that.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

Thanks RL.. I've seen it twice now and still no closer to an ID. Any suggestions?

RandyL.
RandyL. 7 years ago

I don't think it's a Laetiporus species.

Neil Ross
Neil Ross 7 years ago

Yep. Oh fungi! Not grossed out at all. If anything, I'm the gross one. I just want to touch it.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

If it is L sulphureus then it's amazing enough that it's here, and on eucalyptus, AND a worry because it is a heart-rot species (kills the tree). Still not happy with this - for one the pore surface in the USA is always slightly yellow and these are white... oh fungi !! here we go again.... and yes I thought I would show some grossness VFT :-)

Neil Ross
Neil Ross 7 years ago

Cool spotting, Mark. Do you think this may be a parasitic fungi species? Excellent photos of this amazing find.

Caleb Steindel
Caleb Steindel 7 years ago

gross

Mark Ridgway
Spotted by
Mark Ridgway

Victoria, Australia

Spotted on Apr 20, 2014
Submitted on Apr 20, 2014

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