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Half-wing Moth

Phigalia titea

Description:

Description The Half-Wing has a wingspan of approximately 1.5 inches. The male’s forewings are powdery gray with thick brown wavy lines and thinner black squiggles. The hindwings are light gray with a few darker gray lines. The female is wingless. The caterpillar is gray with black pinstripes the length of the body. There are orange patches at the spiracles. There are fine black hairs on the dorsal side. The head is peppered with black spots. The mature caterpillar grows to approximately 1.4 inches. Occurrence The frequency of occurrence is not known. The adults fly in early spring. The individual shown here was photographed at Fontenelle Forest Nature Center in early April. Comments The larval foodplants are American basswood, American elm, hickories, maples and oaks. There is a single brood in early spring. The caterpillars are new leaf specialists and will not eat old leaves. The eggs are laid in bark crevices and the first instars crawl or balloon on silk threads to foliage on the host trees. See reference for source of information listed above.

1 Species ID Suggestions

Half-wing Moth
Phigalia titea


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2 Comments

EmilyUmbarger
EmilyUmbarger 8 years ago

Awesome, thanks Jakubko! So excited to see my first moth of the spring! After months of nothing too terribly exciting, I can't wait for spring to finally be here! Thanks for the ID help, that's what I was thinking it was. :)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 8 years ago

An excellent Spring find!

EmilyUmbarger
Spotted by
EmilyUmbarger

Michigan, USA

Spotted on Apr 22, 2014
Submitted on Apr 22, 2014

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