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Hemitrichia

Hemitrichia sp.




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20 Comments

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

maybe Trichia decipiens is a correct ID

This is beauty!

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

Thanks Adarsha and arlanda

arlanda
arlanda 6 years ago

good spotting

Adarsha B S
Adarsha B S 6 years ago

Awesome find Lucky :) Hence the name lucky :P

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

It's definitely changing fast, even some of the stuff in my school books is out of date an they're brand new books.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 6 years ago

Amazing isn't it. In some ways I think I'm lucky to have started my biology trip so late - everything is changing so fast - mostly thanks to modern technology.

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

Interesting read. Just when I thought I was understanding taxonomy

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 6 years ago

No leave the category alone.. that's where most of the others are. The slime molds are quite different from other life forms. It's probably best to read on Wikipedia especially under taxonomy. Often they are like a cruising 'soup' of plasma and nucleii and when certain conditions are good they become 'cellular' gadgets producing weird those fruiting bodies. Read on here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slime_mold

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

Suzanne - It's fine, this is what I like to see on the site, the trade of information and if something I do sparks that, that makes it even more awesome. Being a teen I see how disliked the sciences are in school and it's great to see that people do care.
Mark- Thanks for the info. If it isn't a fungi should I put it under the "Other" category? And what makes them different from fungi?
Maria- Even thought the links weren't intended for me i checked them out. They're great! I haven't really looked through the blog portion of the site but it's cool to see that there good info on this site because that increases the longevity of sites like this.
I have to agree with Suzanne, the administration of this site is really good. It makes it a site I come back to time after time.

suzmonk
suzmonk 6 years ago

Cool, Maria dB, homework! And, Lucky, I'm sorry I swamped your thread ... ack.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 6 years ago

Nice find LuckyLogan. Fascinating and beautiful life forms that don't last very long. Actually they're not even fungi any more but in a different kingdom - Amoebozoa. But they often appear under similar conditions so people still wrap them up together . Well done.

Maria dB
Maria dB 6 years ago

Well, at the risk of overloading you with more info, here are two more blogs on why the scientific names are important for Noah: http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/3371137... and http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/2870249...

Good to hear that you are enjoying Noah!

suzmonk
suzmonk 6 years ago

Well, how awesome ... there you are. Project Noah really is one of the best administered sites I've ever visited. Scanned the blog you suggested, great info and I'm with you so far ... kings play chess on fiber-glass stools. But it seemed to stop short of talking about the extra letters and abbreviations in plant names. And, truth is, it's probably more detail than a non-professional nature lover like me really needs ... but people really seem to strive to research that absolutely correct identification and understand what they're reading ... another thing I really like about Project Noah community.

Maria dB
Maria dB 6 years ago

Suzanne - that is great that you have been reading up on scientific identification. There is a Project Noah blog that goes into this: http://blog.projectnoah.org/post/3133882...

suzmonk
suzmonk 6 years ago

OK. Truth is, I've been ignoring the extra letters and abbreviations in plant names forever, basically, I had some kind of vague idea about special varieties, but that's about it. So I went and read a bunch of things about botanical name notation. Pretty stiff learning curve and I'm real dizzy. But here's what I came away with ... sometimes a plant name includes, in abbreviated form, the name of the person who "discovered" it ... often when identifying a unique group of plants below the species level.

Hemitrichia is a genus of fungi. So, on your web link, that makes Hemitrichia calyculata ... genus Hemitrichia, species calyculata. So far so good. The Rostaf. in "Hemitrichia Rostaf." is short for Józef Rostafiński, a famous Polish botanist. And this is where I go off the beam ... because on your link, we're not seeing genus name, species name, Rostaf. We're seeing genus name, Rostaf. Perhaps "Rostaf" is substituting for a species name. I dunno. Maybe we need a blog explaining how the naming of living things works.

Or ... you could just call it "Hemitrichia calyculata" and be done with it. Ha! Ha-ha-ha!

LuckyLogan
LuckyLogan 6 years ago

Hey Suzanne, I agree, there are some that look like what i found, this one specifically http://mushroomobserver.org/46184?q=1LBc.... But I'm not sure what info I can get from this. Like, is Hemitrichia a genus or family?

suzmonk
suzmonk 6 years ago

Ran across this, the direct link didn't pull over properly. Maybe helpful. Go to http://mushroomobserver.org and enter "Hemitrichia" ... two things there that look a lot like your spotting.

very nice spotting i think its a slime mold se this spotting i maked a few weeks ago,it's diferente but at same time similar http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/177...

Jason Alexander
Jason Alexander 6 years ago

Cute!

LuckyLogan
Spotted by
LuckyLogan

Iowa, USA

Lat: 42.64, Long: -96.32

Spotted on Jun 17, 2013
Submitted on Jun 17, 2013

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