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Cooper's Hawk( Part 1 of 4)

Accipter cooperii

Description:

This bird was perched about 6 ft away from where I stood. Gave me a chance to take a few close ups. this is part 1 of a series,to follow. Pale nape,rich buffy chest and gorgeous red eyes and a banded tail. I was able to observe his nictitating membrane. He stood with a slightly drooping wing and his leg pulled up,occasionally. Beautiful accipter!!

Habitat:

foothills

Notes:

triggered a lamenting from the surrounding bird population. Part 1 of 4 Part 2 http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/274... part 3 http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/273... Part 4 http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/274...

2 Species ID Suggestions

Sharp-shinned Hawk
Accipter striatus
Cooper's Hawk
Accipter cooperii


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36 Comments (1–25)

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Satyen, I was lucky to see a Shikra in Baroda, It is a beauty.Similar to this bird,the plumage of a shikra is grayish.

Wild Things
Wild Things 7 years ago

That is exactly what I thought when I saw these pics :-)

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

thanks. This is an American "Shikra" :)

Wild Things
Wild Things 7 years ago

Awesome series!

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

thank you Wilson.

Wilson W
Wilson W 7 years ago

Great shot!

Waiting for part 4!

Liam
Liam 7 years ago

Wow, very extensive discussion. Looks like a classic Cooper's to me - gray nape, round tail, bulging supraorbital ridge. It's an adult, but I'm not sure if sex can be determined without both male and female present.

LuisStevens
LuisStevens 7 years ago

Beautiful series Jemma!

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

jellis,it probably looks underweight because it is an immature hawk?

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

If you noticed,it has a drooping wing. Emily indicated that it could be an injury. It was flying around quite well though.

Jellis
Jellis 7 years ago

Yes I see that now. I am also leaning to Coop. Varied length of tail feathers, eyes close to front. Hard to tell with the head and chest. It looks underweight.

AshleyT
AshleyT 7 years ago

If you read the notes section Jellis, Jemma gives links for other spottings of this same individual that have many other pictures.

Jellis
Jellis 7 years ago

Too me the major thing is the size. The Sharp Shinned is about the size of a Eurasian Collared Dove and the Cooper's is way bigger. Plus the size of the head compared to the body. And the chest shape. I don't see a tail in any of these images.

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Updated to "Cooper's Hawk" Thanks to all Hawk lovers for their interest. Was appreciated!.

Mona Pirih
Mona Pirih 7 years ago

I agree with Ashley.., I think is a Cooper's Hawk - male. I check from Raptors of the World a field guide, James Ferguson - Lees; David Christie 's book.

AshleyT
AshleyT 7 years ago

No, adults have a white band. "Tail Tip: The tip of the tail is rounded and has a white terminal band. The width of the white tip can vary depending on how worn the feathers are, but it is nearly always noticeable." Sharp-shinned have a very thin white tip. But the white is not the main character I'm looking at, I'm going by the shape of the tail. That makes me very confident in this being a Cooper's. Yes, I could be wrong, but until someone can show me why it's a Sharp-shinned I am confidently sticking to Cooper's.

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Ashley ,thanks for your valuable feedback.
One major factor which confuses me is that he neighbors have been talking about a sharp shinned hawk in the neighborhood. Maybe they are equally confused.
What you say holds true for an immature Coopers hawk with the tail ending in a terminal white band.
And who says that? None other than Cornell's Lab.Scroll down! thanks!
http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Coope...

AshleyT
AshleyT 7 years ago

I am 99% positive this is a Cooper's Hawk. Especially when you look in your Part 3 series, you get clear looks at the tail. Sharp-shinned is very straight with a slight curve upward in the middle. Cooper's has a slight curve and more of a white edge, just like yours has.

EmilyMarino
EmilyMarino 7 years ago

Sooo...I'm still leaning sharpie, but I'm less sure now. Part 2, picture 3 makes me think 100% sharpie due to the flat squared tail. Legs also look really skinny. However, several of the pictures in part 3 make me go either way. Let's just say I wouldn't bet any money guessing on these pics! This is a tough one...

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Next time I see it , I will try and catch a video.

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Great link Landmark. This is an adult for sure.

Hema
Hema 7 years ago

Thnx Both.
Coopers vs Sharp Shinned,
Let the voting begin.:)

Caleb Steindel
Caleb Steindel 7 years ago

yes, i just looked. i now would vote cooper's i think as well
your welcome!

ConorSheaWing
ConorSheaWing 7 years ago

Coopers and Sharpies are the most confusing/debatable spottings on project Noah. (In my experience). If you look on the Wikipedia page for Sharpies/Coopers towards the bottom they have a picture of the two next to each other, use that as a reference. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharp-shin...

Hema
Spotted by
Hema

Concord, California, USA

Spotted on Jun 18, 2013
Submitted on Jun 18, 2013

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