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Staghorn Sumac

Rhus Typhina

Description:

The Staghorn Sumacs full name is the Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac. Otherwise known as its scientific name, Rhus Typhina. The Staghorn Sumac can grow to be 30 feet tall. It is actually a gigantic shrub, not a tree. It mostly grows on the eastern side of North America, South-West Canada, and North-East America. The Staghorn Sumac gets its name from the reddish, brown, velvety fuzz on the younger, upper stems. It reminds us of the velvety fuzz on a male deer’s antlers. The curve on the stem of the Staghorn Sumac reminds us of the curve on the antlers. The Staghorn Sumac produces fruit from June to September. The fruit grows in clusters, like grapes. The Staghorn Sumac is actually part of the cashew family. It has fern like leafs. Bees and other pollinating insects land on the staghorn sumac to get some nectar. Sources: Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Encyclopedia Britannica, HGTV, and eNature.

Habitat:

It mostly grows on the eastern side of North America, South-West Canada, and North-East America. It grows at the edge of meadows and woods.

Notes:

By Natalie L.

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Whitemarsh Township, Pennsylvania, USA

Spotted on Oct 25, 2016
Submitted on Dec 20, 2016

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