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Pine Buck Moth

Coloradia casanovai

Description:

A pink and grey species of Buck Moth with orange antennae. About 3 cm long. Very hairy thorax and abdomen. The underside is so hairy it is hard to find the legs! (Last picture). Family Saturniidae. These moths feed on pine as larvae. This is a female.

Habitat:

Came to an ultraviolet light in the garden, San Cristobal de Las Casas, 2,200 meters.

2 Species ID Suggestions

Pine moth
Coloradia casanovai


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13 Comments

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 7 years ago

Hello Bill, you are welcome to use the pictures any way you wish. Would you like me to resend them to your email?

BillOehlke
BillOehlke 7 years ago

I agree with Ryan's determination as Coloradia casanovai.
I wish permission to post the images, credited to you to my casanovai page on World's Largest Saturniidae Site. Please send personal email to oehlkew@islandtelecom.com

Bill Oehlke

Ryan St. Laurent
Ryan St. Laurent 7 years ago

I want to mention that I was wrong when I said specimens of female Coloradia casanovai may not exist yet, because one is figured in Lemaire 2002 which matches very closely to your female here. Additionally this species only appears to be known from the vacinity of San Cristóbal de las Casas. I will mention this sighting to Bill Oehlke who runs the World's Largest Saturniidae Site as I am sure he'd love to get your permission to post these lovely photos on his website.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 7 years ago

How neat! Cornell has great Entomology. I have never heard of the Mimallonidae. Sackbearing Moths. I must have some in my photos? And thought they were something else? I would be happy to send you any that I find -

Ryan St. Laurent
Ryan St. Laurent 7 years ago

Hi Lauren,
I am a student at Cornell University, my research interest is Lepidoptera taxonomy, focusing on Mimallonidae. Also Saturniidae (especially Ceratocampinae and Hemileucinae) are of special interest.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 7 years ago

Thank you so much Ryan. I really appreciate your comments. I have placed her as Coloradia casanovai.
Where are you located?

Ryan St. Laurent
Ryan St. Laurent 7 years ago

Pardon the various grammatical errors in my previous response, that's what I get for trying such a message on my phone!

Ryan St. Laurent
Ryan St. Laurent 7 years ago

Coloradia oaxacensis and C. casanovai are very similar and essentially indistinguishable, the newer species, C. oaxacensis was described based on DNA differences from other Coloradia, a method that has proved dubious in many respects (at least in recent years for Saturniidae).

Regardless of the difficultly in distinguishing the two species, I determined yours as C. casanovai because C. casanovai is the more senior name, and if C. oaxacensis proves not to be a valid species, than C. casanovai would be proper name for any south Mexican Coloradia resembling this individual pending other evidence. Additionally, when there are countless species described based on DNA evidence it becomes very difficult to reliable determine any specimen without performing the same DNA sequencing techniques, and since this simply is not feasible, one must rely on type localities. So, if this individual was from Oaxaca, at the type locality of C. oaxacensis, I would feel more comfortable determining it as such. But since this individual is from much closer to the C. casanovai locality, and resembles both species, I went with C. casanovai.

I also want to add that you have a here a female. I have not seen images of (specimens may actually not exist yet) a female of either species, so if this individual does not match either photo you have seen so far, that may be a reason why.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 7 years ago

Hi Ryan, Thank you! What do you think of this being Coloradia oaxacensis?
(http://new.esperanzainsects.com/specimen...).
It looks more like C. oaxacensis than the photo I found for C. casanovai, which has a more pronounced spot on the upper wing
(http://www.boldsystems.org/index.php/Tax...).
This last reference lists San Cristobal de Las Casas as the type locality for C. casanovai! Rancho Nuevo is only about 13 km from where this one was photographed.
(http://unibio.unam.mx/collections/specim...). Is C. oaxacensis a valid species?

Ryan St. Laurent
Ryan St. Laurent 7 years ago

This is Coloradia casanovai, the first live individual I have seen. Excellent!

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 7 years ago

Thank you so much J :)

Jacob Gorneau
Jacob Gorneau 7 years ago

Terrific find! I’ve not been able to find a photo with the pink so vividly exhibited as in photo three, but I’m almost certain it is a species Coloradia.

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 8 years ago

Added some pictures of this species...

LaurenZarate
Spotted by
LaurenZarate

San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico

Spotted on Jul 16, 2013
Submitted on Jul 22, 2013

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