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Virginia Creeper (Inflorescence and Berries)

Parthenocissus quinquefolia

Description:

A woody, deciduous vine, Virginia Creeper can be high-climbing or trailing, 3-40 ft. The leaves are palmately compound, composed of five leaflets (rarely three leaflets, particularly on younger vines) joined from a central point on the leafstalk, and range from 3 to 20 cm (rarely 30 cm) across. The leaflets have a toothed margin. The flowers are small and greenish, produced in inconspicuous clusters in late spring, and mature in late summer or early fall into small hard purplish-black berries 5 to 7 mm diameter. These berries contain oxalic acid, which is moderately toxic to humans and other mammals. The berries provide an important winter food source for birds.

Habitat:

Native to eastern and central North America, in southeastern Canada, the eastern and central United States, eastern Mexico, and Guatemala, west as far as Manitoba, South Dakota, Utah and Texas.

Notes:

Spotted along a dirt road in Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

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QWMom
Spotted by
QWMom

Marietta, Georgia, USA

Spotted on Jul 1, 2013
Submitted on Oct 17, 2013

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