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Baby Insect Somethings

Odonata nymphs (naiads)

Description:

Tiny first instar babies found in the water dish of our dog in the garden. They were about 2 mm long and didn't have much of any antennae. Just hatched Dragonfly larvae (naiads). http://corangamite.landcarevic.net.au/to....

Habitat:

Garden, San Cristobal de Las Casas, 2,200 meters.

Notes:

A Dragonfly must have put her eggs in the water dish and they all hatched. There were about 25 babies in the dish, at the bottom. I feel badly because I didn't know what they were and didn't realize they were aquatic and alive. I thought they had fallen in from a bush and had drowned. I poured the water onto a plant. Poor babies.

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9 Comments

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 6 years ago

Thank you Andre and Barbara! I agree, definitely Odonata. Wish I had known when I found them and I would have taken them down to the wetlands. I've never found them before in a water dish!
Thank you ForestDragon, Bill and Adarsha for your comments :)

BarbaraSing
BarbaraSing 6 years ago

Dragonfly nymphs.

Adarsha B S
Adarsha B S 6 years ago

Ha ha ..cool title (Y).....Baby, you got something special..Ha ha :)

andrecoppe
andrecoppe 6 years ago

So cute! They seem to be dragonflies babies (Odonata; Anisoptera). :)

beaker98
beaker98 6 years ago

Those are cute little guys! I have no idea what they are though:) Nice shot!

ForestDragon
ForestDragon 6 years ago

Excellent title. LOL! I am not sure what they are either, though. Sorry!

LaurenZarate
LaurenZarate 6 years ago

Thank you bayucca :) funny….

bayucca
bayucca 6 years ago

Love your Baby Insect Somethings, sorry I am not a baby expert ;-)...

LaurenZarate
Spotted by
LaurenZarate

Chiapas, Mexico

Spotted on Aug 3, 2014
Submitted on Aug 7, 2014

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