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Bennett's Wallaby

Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus

1 Species ID Suggestions

Wallaby


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9 Comments

Shari_Wildlife
Shari_Wildlife 9 years ago

yes thanks for your help too ! its good to get it solved!

hookgv
hookgv 9 years ago

Ahh, good that the riddle is solved.
Makes you feel good. :~)

Shari_Wildlife
Shari_Wildlife 9 years ago

I visited Tasmania a few years ago and got to see that and i wished i had extra fur to deal with the cold =)

lori.tas
lori.tas 9 years ago

Yes, our wallabies are heavier and more heavily furred than the mainland species, to deal with the cold. The same is true of almost all of our animals - they're fatter and fuzzier. I just got back from Cradle Mountain, I saw a few wallabies, a pademelon, and several wombats, oh, and possums of course. They were trying to raid our cabin for food. We gave them some carrot and cucumber to go away.

Shari_Wildlife
Shari_Wildlife 9 years ago

They seem to have a different subspecies. It just looked very different to the Red-necked wallabies I am used to. The fur is much lighter and longer. This solves the mystery though =) This one I spotted at the bottom of cradle mountain

lori.tas
lori.tas 9 years ago

Bennet's wallaby and red-neck wallaby are just two different names for the same animal: Macropus rufogriseus. The dark brown nose is indicative. It appears to be a young one, probably male. That's just the type of grass that they like to graze on.

Shari_Wildlife
Shari_Wildlife 9 years ago

Thanks Pierre!

The MnMs
The MnMs 9 years ago

I agree.. wallaby :-)

hookgv
hookgv 9 years ago

Could be a redneck wallaby

Shari_Wildlife
Spotted by
Shari_Wildlife

Devonport, Tasmania, Australia

Spotted on Jan 5, 2009
Submitted on Jun 26, 2011

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