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Giant House Spider

Tegenaria duellica

Description:

Female body size can reach 18.5 millimetres (0.73 in) in length (making it the largest members of the family), with males having a slightly smaller body at around 12 to 15 millimetres (0.47 to 0.59 in) in length. The female leg span is typically around 45 millimetres (1.8 in). The leg span of the male is highly variable, with spans between 25 to 75 millimetres (0.98 to 3.0 in) being common. The Giant house spider has the same coloration as the Domestic house spider; it has earthy tones of brown and muddy red or yellow. They also have conspicuously hairy legs, palps and abdomen.

Habitat:

The Giant house spider is indigenous to north western Europe. However, it was unwittingly introduced to the Pacific Northwest of North America circa 1900 due to human activity and strongly increased in numbers for the last decade. The webs built by the Giant house spider are flat and messy with a funnel at one end. The spider lurks in the funnel until a small invertebrate happens to get trapped in the web, at which point the spider runs out and attacks it. They usually build their webs in corners (on both the floor and ceiling), between boxes in basements, behind cupboards, in attics, or any other area that is rarely disturbed by large animals, or humans. Often found near window openings. Males can often be seen wandering around houses during the late summer and early autumn looking for a mate.


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1 Comment

JanineLingTurner
JanineLingTurner 6 years ago

thanks :)

JanineLingTurner
Spotted by
JanineLingTurner

Tunbridge Wells, England, United Kingdom

Lat: 51.13, Long: 0.26

Spotted on Nov 7, 2013
Submitted on Nov 7, 2013

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Reference