Nature School Game Contact Blog Project Noah Facebook Project Noah Twitter

A global citizen science platform
to discover, share and identify wildlife

Join Project Noah!
nature school apple icon

Nature School For Teachers - Fall 2020 Launch! visit nature school

'Orb' Medick

Medicago orbicularis

Description:

A helter skelter for ants? I forgot the name of this wonderful legume. It's very low growing

Habitat:

Scrubby grassland

Species ID Suggestions



Sign in to suggest organism ID

17 Comments

ceherzog
ceherzog 8 years ago

Thanks...I'll do some delving into the seed from the forage angle.

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 8 years ago

I know they say it's 'not readily available' but they obviously got their hands on some for the tests....

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 8 years ago

Shucks! Thanks man :)
If i ever find out how to get seed I'll remember you for sure. Had a quick check online...these guys might be worth a try.......http://msucares.com/crops/forages/legumes/cool/buttonclover.html

ceherzog
ceherzog 8 years ago

Well, keep shouting on Project Noah...you're a great addition here...hopefully you will become a Ranger soon.

If you ever find a source for the seeds of this plant, I would be most interested in obtaining some.

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 8 years ago

Thanks Ashish and for the reply ceherzog. Sorry to take so long on getting back. Yes, I've heard of Horticultural Therapy and am a great believer in its power. The workshop I led was a member of Thrive, the main Hort. Therapy charity here in the UK. They're having a new headquarters garden built in Battersea, soon I believe. A mental health focussed charity called Mind also use Hort. Therapy with great success and have a fine project near Kensington. It's a field I've thought about going into some day but at the moment I feel like shouting about botanics and biodiversity for a while.

Ashish Nimkar
Ashish Nimkar 9 years ago

Hmmm... Nice stuff... from Fabaceae...
Never herd about Genus Medicago...!!

ceherzog
ceherzog 9 years ago

Craig, Well, yes, the carnivorous plants are always appealing....but tropical fruit (just did a lesson on Starfruit...the kids love them) is very enticing....any food plants that you can ultimately cook or taste are wildly popular, especially for middle schoolers. I worked with developmentally disabled students before this job and now work with many students with learning disabilities and also children with autism. Horticulture is a great venue for people with disabilities. Have you heard of the field of Horticultural Therapy? I have been very active with this group.

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 9 years ago

Updated with ID. Med. distribution but seems like it's found its way into some States of the US too

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 9 years ago

Oops, the perils of late night misreading. Sorry about the promotion! I'd be really interested in hearing more about how you're turning kids on to plants. I've never worked directly with kids but I ran a hort. workshop with people with learning dissabilities for a couple of years before Kew. I've been compiling a list of plants that I think would be cool to show kids - something I think all Botanic Gardens need to engage in as much as possible. It's mainly carnivorous and things that move or smell pretty terrible! Of course, I think once you've got a chance to teach the magic of growing something, you're half way there. Anyway, would love to hear about your experience some time.

ceherzog
ceherzog 9 years ago

Dr. Dodson was great to work for...I still have dinner with him on occasion...
Dr. D was Director of the Gardens, I was Director of Horticulture...and I do love my present vocation..nothing like turning kids on to plants.

Who knows, maybe you'll end up at Marie Selby!

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 9 years ago

Yes, it's definitely in Fabaceae.

Ashish Nimkar
Ashish Nimkar 9 years ago

Can be a Fabaceae plant...

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 9 years ago

I would also love some seeds of this! Unfortunately, this was the only plant we saw in two weeks and as we were told it was a bit of a rarity I left the pods well alone (it helped that none looked fully mature:)) I have the name in my notes but I think they went into the back of a large storage unit a few months ago!

I'm a horticulturalist but I'm very into pollination biology, especially of orchids and hope to raise the funds to do some studies on certain spp. in the future. The study I did on Ophrys speculum was part of the Ecology field trip to Andalucia with the Kew Diploma of Horticulture and Reading University.

I see you were Director of Marie Selby. That's very cool indeed, as is your current occupation! Having just finished at Kew, I'm looking to get into a Botanic Garden somewhere (preferably one with a decent orchid collection) and get going growing some amazing things to show to people. It must've been great to work with Dr. Calloway Dodson, he's a bit of a legend in the Orchid world.

KarenL
KarenL 9 years ago

Very interesting spot!

ceherzog
ceherzog 9 years ago

Oh yes, I see that now...I would love to have some seeds of this.
I think you do pollination biology on orchids, right? Are you familiar with Dr. Calloway Dodson? (Orchid Flowers: Their Pollination and Evolution. van der Pijl & Dodson) I worked with him for many years at Selby Gardens in Florida.

craigwilliams
craigwilliams 9 years ago

This is the seed pod. Unfortunately the leaves let the side down a bit! They're fairly typical pinnate vetchy things.

ceherzog
ceherzog 9 years ago

wow! Does the leaf spiral?...I love it!

craigwilliams
Spotted by
craigwilliams

Ferreira, Andalucía, Spain

Spotted on Oct 12, 2011
Submitted on Oct 12, 2011

Related Spottings

Black Medic sea medick Alfalfa? Bur clover, Strand-Schneckenklee

Nearby Spottings

Spanish Fly Bee Crocus Spotting
Noah Guardians
Noah Sponsors