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dog stinkhorn

Mutinus caninus var. albus

Description:

This small member of the Phallaceae family emerges from an off-white egg-like fruiting body that lies half buried in leaf litter on the woodland floor. White mycelial cords (rhizomorphs), are often visible beneath this 'egg', which is 2–4 cm (0.8–1.6 in) high, and 1–2 cm (0.4–0.8 in) wide. The 'egg' has a tough outer skin (peridium), which covers a gelatinous inner layer, which in turn protects the fully formed, but unexpanded fruiting body. When the ‘egg’ splits open the fungus expands rapidly (usually within a few hours), to its full height of 10–12 cm (4–5 in). It is around 1 cm (0.4 in) thick, and is either yellowish-white, yellow, or pale orange. The split egg is retained as a volva-like sack, at the base. The column is very fragile, pitted, and cylindrical. It has a pointed tip, and is usually curved. The tip is covered in the spore bearing matter (gleba) which is a dark olive-brown paste, and has a smell which is irresistible to insects. (These insects help distribute the spores on their bodies, and in their stomachs.) Beneath the spore mass the tip is dark orange. Although its smell is not as strong as the related common stinkhorn (Phallus impudicus), it has been described as smelling like cat faeces

Habitat:

The dog stinkhorn is found occasionally, and is quite common in Europe, Britain, and Eastern North America. The fungus is listed in the red data list of the Ukraine. A collection from the Canary Islands was noted as the southernmost collection for the species in the Northern Hemisphere. It is also been collected in Iran, Turkey, and China, including Hebei, Jilin, and Guangdong. It appears from summer to late autumn, and is usually found in small groups; in leaf litter; on wood debris, or wooded roadsides. It may occur in both deciduous, and coniferous woods. The fruit bodies of the fungus can serve as a food source for developing blow flies (Phormia regina)

Notes:

American mycologist Sanford Myron Zeller described an albino form of the fungus based on collections made in Warrengon, Oregon. This form, named M. caninus var. albus, was first mentioned in the scientific literature by Edward Angus Burt in 1896. It is essentially identical to the regular form except that it is pure white throughout, except for the gleba. --- Similar species Mutinus ravenelii is pinker in coloration, with a red tip. It is a rarer American species, now spreading in Europe. Another North American species Mutinus elegans is very similar to M. ravenelii, and is short and stocky, with a more pointed apex

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6 Comments

AlexKonig
AlexKonig 7 years ago

when you want to see more (shebebusynow) then look through my spotting, have some other species, specimen and feature ( like the eggs). and i will upload another one, (the biggest i have seen and from the fam. the biggest). when i understand this right (because mostly i get the most infos in english from wikipedia), the mutinus caninus and variation alba is found in oregon, and the habitat desciption from wiki, says: quite common in Europe, Britain, and Eastern North America. The fungus is listed in the red data list of the Ukraine. A collection from the Canary Islands was noted as the southernmost collection for the species in the Northern Hemisphere. It is also been collected in Iran, Turkey, and China, including Hebei, Jilin, and Guangdong. It appears from summer to late autumn, and is usually found in small groups; in leaf litter; on wood debris, or wooded roadsides. It may occur in both deciduous, and coniferous woods. NOW is the right time for at least 2 species (here in netherland), it's getting colder and not wet but moist and all the rotting autumm leaves, when the weather is somewhat similar, go get out, find one the pink M. elegans maybe. good luck

shebebusynow
shebebusynow 7 years ago

I always wanted to see one of these--these are great! Now I see from your entry that they actually grow in Oregon.

AlexKonig
AlexKonig 7 years ago

i really thought at this solution, now the first time i will the already uploaded pictures burn on a dvd. And some spotting which i upload in the winter also.

LarsKorb
LarsKorb 7 years ago

haha...that's no probloem - get yourself an external drive

AlexKonig
AlexKonig 7 years ago

surely, the cam is good, could maybe a little better at the makro, but i will not cry. only problem: i have not enough gb on the computer free !!! :)

LarsKorb
LarsKorb 7 years ago

wow..excellent shots, Alex - the new cam pays :)

Kerkrade, Limburg, Netherlands

Lat: 50.89, Long: 6.06

Spotted on Oct 10, 2011
Submitted on Oct 16, 2011

Spotted for mission

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