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Austrian Pine

Pinus nigra

Description:

Medium sized pine, Neddles 4 inch

Habitat:

Europe

Notes:

Tree planted by landscapers, it seems to be a slow growing medium size pine. Very well chosen tree that fits into the surrounding area well.

1 Species ID Suggestions

shebebusynow
shebebusynow 10 years ago
Shore pine
Pinus contorta


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9 Comments

ja.emmans
ja.emmans 10 years ago

I checked this tree again and feel it is the shore pine one reason is they would not plant a large tree specie next to a road and the needles are in pairs and shorter than 3 inches.

ja.emmans
ja.emmans 10 years ago

Yes the must be more like 3-4 inch needles, will have to check again. The do look like twin needles though.

shebebusynow
shebebusynow 10 years ago

I went and checked our shore pines today & the needles come in bundles of two and they are about 2 inches long. Yours might be longer, it's a little hard to see. You could also check out the Ponderosa pine. They have longer needles & cones than the shore pine. They get really tall, but it takes many decades to get the 200 feet you sometimes see. http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/600... The Ponderosa has 3 needles in a sheath.

ja.emmans
ja.emmans 10 years ago

In this case it is planted next to a new road about 15 years ago. Thanks for the ID will check that out just in case.

shebebusynow
shebebusynow 10 years ago

Looks very much like our shore pine, though in this case it's growing alone and out of the wind.I suspect that David Douglas brought this species to England in the 1830's. It's the predominant species on the Pacific Northwest coast of US near the ocean, but doesn't usually get real tall because the strong winds (over 100 mph isn't all that unusual) tend to keep the branches pruned and contorted. In the mountains when it grows in thick stands it is very straight-trunked, thus its name "lodgepole pine", for use with tipis.

dandoucette
dandoucette 10 years ago

Thanks, unfortunately, I'm not great with ID of pines but I'm hoping this will help someone else to ID it.

ja.emmans
ja.emmans 10 years ago

Got the needles and cones ready now.

ja.emmans
ja.emmans 10 years ago

Ok thanks, landscapers will know this tree, I will make it a bit easier, it is a really nice specie. Will post some needle and cone detail later.

dandoucette
dandoucette 10 years ago

I like how you have an overall photo of the tree. It's a species of Pinus. Adding close ups of the needles and the branches will help to get the ID to the species level. Welcome to Project Noah.

ja.emmans
Spotted by
ja.emmans

London, England, United Kingdom

Spotted on Oct 19, 2011
Submitted on Oct 20, 2011

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