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Blue Club Tunicate

Rhopalaea crassa

Notes:

Solitary small translucent blue club tunicate. Dive and Trek house reef, Batangas

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18 Comments

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Glad you liked it Mayra :-)

MayraSpringmann
MayraSpringmann 9 years ago

Fantastic!!

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Thanks Avinash. Do go scuba diving with us when you're here :-)

Avinash Hindupur
Avinash Hindupur 9 years ago

These colors are so amazing..! Right now, all I want to do is go scuba diving with you guys. Atleast Project Noah gave me very good real alternative.!

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

I guess it does Ismael :-)

Ismael Chaves
Ismael Chaves 9 years ago

It looks like a Wormhole

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Thanks IgCostaNut. Will do :-)

LarryGraziano
LarryGraziano 9 years ago

Beautiful Eric! you can add this to the new "color blue" mission:
http://www.projectnoah.org/missions/8382...

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Great info @madasamarinebiologist and thanks! :-)

SamanthaCraven
SamanthaCraven 9 years ago

...and great photo :)

SamanthaCraven
SamanthaCraven 9 years ago

Tunicates are often said to be the link between inverts and vertebrates. They look like sponges, but are far more developed, with digestive, circulatory and reproductive systems. Their larvae have a 'notochord' - a primitive spinal chord - thus the 'link'!

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Hi Moralcoral. Thanks for the supporting information. And yes was thinking it could be a Rhopalaea crassa. Just really hard IDing them sometimes if we don't get to see a similar picture from the net with a definitive name :-)

Eric Noora
Eric Noora 9 years ago

Hi Alice. Moralcoral is right on the info on what they do to the ecosystem. More importantly they have the potential to be a source of medically beneficial chemical compounds. :-)

moralcoral
moralcoral 9 years ago

i see you thought the same now maybe should have read your description =) good we are thinking along the same lines, its so hald to id thes things my friend does them by extracting the spicules with nitric acid! very complex!

moralcoral
moralcoral 9 years ago

think it could be Rhopalaea crassa!

moralcoral
moralcoral 9 years ago

they are also an importank like in the marine food web becoiming food to fishes, there is also potential for pharmacutacals as with many marine species!

moralcoral
moralcoral 9 years ago

they filter the water feeding on tiny bacterias and plankton helping to reduce organic matter in the water colum and helping to keep the sea clear!

alicelongmartin
alicelongmartin 9 years ago

I believe my knowledge of the sea and oceans is pretty limited because there is so much I don't know, but this is very pretty. Does it do something?

Eric Noora
Spotted by
Eric Noora

Batangas, Philippines

Spotted on Oct 30, 2011
Submitted on Nov 1, 2011

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