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Clusia Grandiflora

Clusia Grandiflora

Description:

Big dead flower. 20 cm? Not sure what colours they are when fresh, but very fleshy brown like when dead. I guess it had white petals and a pink heart, but the ones I found on the jungle floor where brown with some pink leftovers on the underside. Slimy anemone looking heart.

Habitat:

On jungle floor near the river and Angel Falls, Canaima, Bolivar, Venezuela.

Notes:

This species is unique in that it belongs to the only genus of plants capable of absorbing carbon dioxide during the night. Medicinal use. The whole plant:, decocted with species of Smilax, Strychnos, Doliocarpus, Philodendron and Bauhinia scala-simiae, is made into a tonic. The liquid from the cut liana is used as a wash to relieve aching bones and as a treatment for botfly larvae. Cut pieces of the aerial roots are soaked in water or wine to make an infusion which is used as tonic for relieving back pain. The latex from the stem is used effectively in a plaster to treat body aches. Latex from the bark is antiseptic and vulnerary. It is applied, usually mixed with water, to wounds for healing. The root is used to treat back pain. The wood is boiled, and the water used as an antiseptic agent, for treating sores or as a treatment for cuts and wounds. The leaves are rich in flavonoids.

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Grand clusia
Clusia grandiflora Clusia grandiflora


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14 Comments

DanielePralong
DanielePralong 2 months ago

What a great series Debbie! I'm glad you got an ID, and congratulations on your nomination! A comment regarding your notes: Clusia is not the only genus of plants capable of absorbing carbon dioxide during the night. This phenomenon, known as CAM for Crassulacean Acid Metabolism, or CAM photosynthesis, was discovered in the family Crassulaceae, also known as the stonecrop family. All plants in this family possess CAM. It is also found in other groups of plants. You can read more about it here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulace...

Leuba Ridgway
Leuba Ridgway 2 months ago

Great spotting with interesting information. Thanks Muckpuk.

Muckpuk
Muckpuk 2 months ago

Maria dB
Yes. I saw them on the way up towards the Angel Falls and on our way back I took some time to take these pictures and stayed behind. They were all lying close to each other in different stages of decay. The brown one were the most dead. The pink in the pictures is actually the underside of the flower. The spot must have been under the tree but I did not see any flowers higher up.

Muckpuk
Muckpuk 2 months ago

Thanks AntónioGinjaGinja
I am always very excited and honored to getting nominated.

Your spotting has been nominated for the Spotting of the Week. The winner will be chosen by the Project Noah Rangers based on a combination of factors including: uniqueness of the shot, status of the organism (for example, rare or endangered), quality of the information provided in the habitat and description sections. There is a subjective element, of course; the spotting with the highest number of Ranger votes is chosen. Congratulations on being nominated!

Maria dB
Maria dB 2 months ago

Were the pink and white ones near the brown one?

Muckpuk
Muckpuk 2 months ago

That's the one!!! Thank you Mark Ridgway!!!
Much appreciated!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 months ago
Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 2 months ago

Lovely series.. fascinating flower.

Machi
Machi a year ago

No I don't know. You could just leave it at Gustavia sp. for the scientific name though.

Muckpuk
Muckpuk a year ago

Yes Machi. You are right! That is what it looks like. Any idea what kind of Gustavia???? They all look similar.

Machi
Machi a year ago

Looks like Gustavia sp.

Muckpuk
Muckpuk a year ago

Thanks Brian38
I hope anyone can tell me what the flower is. The guide was not very interested in telling us so we could remember :-(
And he was not very impressed so maybe it is a dead common flower. I thought it was gorgeous in a sort of anemone kind of way.

Brian38
Brian38 a year ago

Great spotting Muckpuk!! There is a good chance this is the first spotting on Project Noah for this species.

Muckpuk
Spotted by
Muckpuk

Parroquia Sección Capital Gran Sabana, Bolívar, Venezuela

Lat: 5.97, Long: -62.53

Spotted on Jan 5, 2018
Submitted on Jan 29, 2018

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