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moth

Syntomoides imaon

Description:

Noctuidae, Arctiinae



1 species ID suggestions

(different throughout India, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Sikkim)
Syntomoides imaon Syntomoides imaon

13 Comments

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 7 years ago

You're welcome PraveenVijayan (S Frazier)

PraveenVijayan
PraveenVijayan 7 years ago

Yes.. Thanks Feazir.

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 7 years ago

Yes, this is a clear match. Good work argybee. PraveenVijayan if I may, the Scientific name field is meant for, in this case, Syntomoides imaon. I will change that for you. The spotting name is meant to use a common name such as "wasp moth". The classification of these moths is undergoing revision but Amata, Euchromia and Syntomoides all belong to the same group (subfamily Ctenuchinae). I think you could still call it that. The terms you have put in the scientific name could be used as tags or in the description. Well it's been a learning experience for all of us. That's what I like about Project Noah.

PraveenVijayan
PraveenVijayan 7 years ago

Thanks argybee. Its seems to be correct.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

Hi S Frazier, Whatever the ID is, these two seem to be the same.
In my opinion the previous one was not fully ID'd either so if that's in error the error is being replicated here.
I don't know if you followed the link above but there is nothing there that seems even close to me and certainly nothing as close as Amata fortunei.
Note with Af. in wikipedia only 2 bands are completely encompassing - the others are shortened, and may only be visible from below and the wing angle and spots look almost a perfect match.
When martinl posted his original suggestion AND link it was just accepted as it stood even though he stated it should only be a starting point. That's what's been copied to here so IF there's an error it's now spreading.
Thanks for responding.

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 7 years ago

My input was in the context of the above comments. IF this spotting was said to be the same as the other spotting mentioned, and IF that spotting was Euchromia isis, I thought that THIS spotting looked different in terms of wing spots. My experience with Euchromia is that sometimes certain of the species are a bit hard to differentiate. I would not discourage further searching including Amata genus. I have not looked hard but I have not found a match. I don't think Amata fortunei fits (too many orange bands). A Euchromia link is already posted above.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

I keep finding Amata that look very close... please explain.

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

Has anyone got a link to any image that matches Euchromia ?
I can't even find one similar.

PraveenVijayan
PraveenVijayan 7 years ago

Okay thanks Feazir. Changed to Euchromia sp.

Scott Frazier
Scott Frazier 7 years ago

Great spotting. You can narrow it even further I think by calling it a "wasp moth" as tiger moth sometimes is used to refer to the entire family. In any event wasp moths and tiger moths both are in the family Arctiidae (or now called Erebidae!). While yours may be the same (genus) as the spotting suggested by KarenL, the wing spots look quite different and "may" represent a different species. Euchromia has several species with subtle differences...You could play it safe and name it Euchromia sp. (scientific name)

PraveenVijayan
PraveenVijayan 7 years ago

Thanks Karen.. helpful link. Both are same.

KarenL
KarenL 7 years ago

This is very similar to a spotting from Romesh yesterday! http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/816...

Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India

Lat: 8.58, Long: 77.09

Spotted on Dec 23, 2011
Submitted on Dec 23, 2011

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