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wasp nest slime mold spores

Metatrichia vesparia spores

Description:

Capillitium red, consisting of a few very long coiled tubules, 5-6 µm diam., with 3-5 spirals and spines up to 4 µm long. Spores pale orange-red, 9-10 µm diam., verrucose and bordered in optical section ( http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?searc... ) ( pseudoaethalium--> http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/820... )

Habitat:

The Amoebozoa are a major group of amoeboid protozoa, including the majority that move by means of internal cytoplasmic flow. Their pseudopodia are characteristically blunt and finger-like, called lobopodia. Most are unicellular, and are common in soils and aquatic habitats, with some found as symbiotes of other organisms, including several pathogens. The Amoebozoa also include the slime moulds, multinucleate or multicellular forms that produce spores and are usually visible to the unaided eye. Amoebozoa vary greatly in size. Many are only 10-20 μm in size, but they also include many of the larger protozoa. The famous species Amoeba proteus may reach 800 μm in length, and partly on account of its size is often studied as a representative cell. Multinucleate amoebae like Chaos and Pelomyxa may be several millimetres in length, and some slime moulds cover several square feet

Notes:

Slime mold or mould is a broad term describing protists that use spores to reproduce. Slime molds were formerly classified as fungi, but are no longer considered part of this kingdom. Their common name refers to part of some of these organisms' life cycles where they can appear as gelatinous "slime". This is mostly seen with the myxomycetes, which are the only macroscopic slime molds. Slime molds have been found all over the world and feed on microorganisms that live in any type of dead plant material. For this reason, these organisms are usually found in soil, lawns, and on the forest floor, commonly on deciduous logs. However, in tropical areas they are also common on inflorescences, fruits and in aerial situations (e.g., in the canopy of trees) and also grow in air conditioners, especially when the drain is blocked. In urban areas, they are found on mulch or even in the leaf mold in gutters. One of the most commonly encountered slime molds is the yellow Physarum polycephalum, found both in nature in forests in temperate zones, as well as in classrooms and laboratories. Most slime molds are smaller than a few centimeters, but some species may reach sizes of up to several square meters and masses of up to 30 grams. Many have striking colours such as yellow, brown and white ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slime_mold )

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1 Comment

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 7 years ago

that last one has made me hungry

Horst aan de Maas, Limburg, Netherlands

Lat: 51.44, Long: 6.06

Spotted on Dec 22, 2011
Submitted on Dec 27, 2011

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