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Wood Stork

Mycteria americana

Description:

The Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) is a large American wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. It was formerly called the "Wood Ibis", though it is not really an ibis. e adult is a large bird 83–115 cm (33–45 in) tall and 140–180 cm (58–71 in) in wingspan. Males typically weigh 2.5–3.3 kg (5.5-7.3 lbs); females weigh 2.0–2.8 kg (4.4-6.2 lbs),[2] although large birds are up to 4.5 kg (10 lbs).[3] It appears all white on the ground, with blackish-gray legs and pink feet. In flight, the trailing edge of the wings is black. The head is dark brown with a bald, black face, and the thick downcurved bill is dusky yellow. Juvenile birds are a duller version of the adult, generally browner on the neck, and with a paler bill.

Habitat:

This is a subtropical and tropical species which breeds in much of South America, Central America and the Caribbean. The Wood Stork is the only stork that presently breeds in North America. In the United States there is a small and endangered breeding population in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, along with a recently discovered rookery in southeastern North Carolina. On the other hand, in Santa Catarina state (Brazil), its decline seems to have been reversed: after an absence between the late 1960s and the mid-1990s, the species is now again regularly encountered there, in particular in the Tubarão River region.[4] It is likely that the Paraná River region's wetlands served as a stronghold of the species, from where it is now re-colonizing some of its former haunts.[5] Globally, it is considered a Species of Least Concern by the IUCN due to its large range.[6]

1 Species ID Suggestions

Liam
Liam 9 years ago
Wood Stork
Mycteria americana Wood Stork


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2 Comments

July Llanes
July Llanes 9 years ago

Thanks! :)

Sachin Zaveri
Sachin Zaveri 9 years ago

Very Nice,

July Llanes
Spotted by
July Llanes

Orlando, Florida, USA

Spotted on Jan 5, 2012
Submitted on Jan 18, 2012

Spotted for Mission

Reference

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