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Bryozoan colony

Pectinatella magnifica

Description:

Bryozoans are an invertebrate that live in colonies, similar to corrals. The following is an excerpt from a response from doctor Timothy Wood- "They help keep the water clear. Many people write to me asking how to get rid of them, as though they were somehow dangerous. Of course they are not. Although the species is native to eastern North America, it has now spread westward across the continent, jumped the Pacific to northern Asia, and is also spreading very rapidly through western Europe. There are a lot of interesting things about Pectinatella and a lot we still do not understand. I hope you can hold onto your pond population for many years."

Habitat:

I found the colony in my spring fed pond.

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14 Comments

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

Just got it. Thank you and yes, fascinating!

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

I commented on your photo as well. How incredibly different! Fascinating!

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

It's the white, structured organism at http://www.projectnoah.org/spottings/785...

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

That's great, Cindy! You said your colony looked different? What did yours look like?

CindyBinghamKeiser
CindyBinghamKeiser 9 years ago

Hi Cynthia, thank you again for providing a contact name for my Bryozoan. They were able to get me in contact with a scientist here on the West Coast and confirm my spotting was Bryozoan!

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

Thanks! It was a mystery for some time as to what it was!

Leuba Ridgway
Leuba Ridgway 9 years ago

Amazing find, great photo and information ! Thanks for sharing this...

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

From the little that's known about them, it was my understanding that the colony eventually disperses (for lack of a better word!) In 2010, when I found this colony, I had no string algae (that slimy, mossy like green stuff) in the pond. I believe there is a connection!

Mark Ridgway
Mark Ridgway 9 years ago

Like sea sponges. Now that's worth further reading. Thanks so much.

mystified45
mystified45 9 years ago

That is the strangest thing I have ever seen!!!

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

There isn't a lot known about them. Whether it was transferred from another source by a bird, or amphibian, or such is unknow. It wouldn't have come directly from the spring since they need light and oxygen.

Maria dB
Maria dB 9 years ago

I'd never heard of them either. How did they get into your pond? From the spring?

Cynthia L.
Cynthia L. 9 years ago

It was rubbery, very solid, actually. When I first found it, I thought it was some kind of amphibian egg mass. But, since it was the fall, I was puzzled. I didn't see it this past fall. I'm going to say it was approximately 9-12 inches in diameter. I found out what it was after several calls to the NY State DEC.

Ava T-B
Ava T-B 9 years ago

How interesting! How big is that colony? Is it soft and squishy? I've never heard of these creatures.

Cynthia L.
Spotted by
Cynthia L.

Richburg, New York, USA

Spotted on Aug 17, 2010
Submitted on Jan 22, 2012

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