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Eastern cottontail rabbit

Sylvilagus floridanus

Description:

The eastern cottontail is chunky red-brown or gray-brown in appearance with large hind feet, long ears and a short fluffy white tail. Its underside fur is white. There is a rusty patch on the tail. Its appearance differs from that of a hare in that it has a brownish-gray coloring around the head and neck. The body is lighter color with a white underside on the tail. It has large brown eyes and large ears to see and listen for danger. In winter the cottontail's pelage is more gray than brown. The kits develop the same coloring after a few weeks, but they also have a white blaze that goes down their forehead; this marking eventually disappears. The average adult weighs about 1.1 to 1.8 kg (2 to 4 lbs); however, the female tends to be heavier.

Habitat:

Optimal eastern cottontail habitat includes open grassy areas, clearings, and old fields supporting abundant green grasses and herbs, with shrubs in the area or edges for cover. The essential components of eastern cottontail habitat are an abundance of well-distributed escape cover (dense shrubs) interspersed with more open foraging areas such as grasslands and pastures. Habitat parameters important for eastern cottontails in ponderosa pine, mixed species, and pinyon (Pinus spp.)-juniper (Juniperus spp.) woodlands include woody debris, herbaceous and shrubby understories, and patchiness. Typically eastern cottontails occupy habitats in and around farms including fields, pastures, open woods, thickets associated with fencerows, wooded thickets, forest edges, and suburban areas with adequate food and cover. They are also found in swamps and marshes and usually avoid dense woods. They are seldom found in deep woods

Notes:

We have several rabbits in the neighborhood, and they hang out frequently in our front yard because we have plenty of shrubs for cover, bird seed from the feeder to eat, and the dogs only have access to the backyard. This particular rabbit found its way into the backyard, so I photographed it for a while as it snacked and then gently chased it off so I could let the dogs outside.

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Aaron_G
Spotted by
Aaron_G

Bartlesville, Oklahoma, USA

Spotted on May 24, 2011
Submitted on Jan 28, 2012

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